Topics/Series Courses

A topics course is one that is not regularly offered at the University of Lethbridge. Departments may use topics courses to try out a new course that they are considering regularizing, or for faculty to offer courses related to their research. Series courses are a group of courses within a certian genre and the offering changes every semester.  You may take multiple topics and series courses for credit as long as each offering is distinct (i.e. having significantly different titles).

If you have any questions about topics courses, please contact the Fine Arts Advising Office (W660).

SPRING 2020 Topics/Series Courses

Advanced Studio

ART 3040
6.0 Credit Hours
 

The following instructors will be available as supervising faculty members for the above mentioned classes in Spring 2020:

  • Dagmar Dahle
  • Denton Fredrickson

Students who register for these courses will interview with each of the supervising faculty members to determine which faculty member will be their instructor of record.  Students must ensure they are registered in the correct section of the course with their assigned instructor by the end of the add/drop period.

 

Senior Studio

Art 4048 & 4049
6.0 Credit Hours
 

The following instructors will be available as supervising faculty members for the above mentioned classes in Spring 2020:

  • Dagmar Dahle
  • Denton Fredrickson

Students who register for these courses will interview with each of the supervising faculty members to determine which faculty member will be their instructor of record.  Students must ensure they are registered in the correct section of the course with their assigned instructor by the end of the add/drop period.

 

Art of the Italian Renaissance

ARHI 3151 A  &  ARHI 4150 A
3.0 Credit Hours
 
We explore the principal trends and key players of the Italian Renaissance, from the 14th through the 16th centuries, in Rome, Florence, Venice, and other artistic centres. Painting, sculpture, and architecture are examined through multiple lenses such as story-telling, patronage, religion, and humanism. Early Modern visual culture and contextual history provide insights into the pivotal works of Italian Renaissance artists, including Giotto, Donatello, Botticelli, Leonardo, and Michelangelo.
 

Prerequisites: One of Art History 1000 or third-year standing (a minimum of 60.0 credit hours)

 

 

Shakespeare for the Intimidated

Drama 3850 Y (Calgary Campus)
3.0 Credit Hours
 

Building on the skills and experience of Drama 2350, this course is designed to expand and deepen the students' ability and facility with speech communication.  It is an entirely studio-based course which focuses on exploring a variety of modes of communication. Through plenty of practice and experiential learning, students will enhance the capacity to speak effectively and affectively before an audience. 

Prerequisite: Drama 2350 OR third year standing (a minimum of 60.0 credit hours)

Music Perception and Cognition

Music 3000 A
3.0 Credit Hours

This course deals with the intersections of music, music theory, cognitive psychology, and data science.  Students will read relevant literature in the field, provide critical summaries of these readings, and submit them either as written assignments or oral presentations. Students will produce a capstone project, in which they will design a music perception/cognition experiment.
 
This course will deliver to the students training in reading scholarly literature, critical analysis, experimental design, statistical analysis of experiment results and inferring conclusions from those results.
 
Prerequisites: Music 3460 – Theory IV OR Psychology 2330 – Learning and Cognition
 

History of Jazz

Music 3200 A
3.0 Credit Hours

This course provides a comprehensive overview of jazz history, covering the major jazz styles and important musicians that have pioneered this music. We will trace jazz from its infancy, beginning in New Orleans and will highlight how this music has developed through the years and has grown into various sub-genres. Some of the styles that will be covered include: Early Jazz, the Swing Era, Bebop, Cool, Fusion and Modern jazz.Other important topics will include learning important jazz terminology, becoming acquainted with the preeminent jazz artists from each style, and most importantly, analyzing how jazz has evolved since the early twentieth-century. We will connect the important stylistic periods of the past and trace the various directions these trends have gone since. This course will provide students the opportunity to broaden their understanding and appreciation of this diverse music form.

Prerequisite: 15 university-level courses (a minimum of 45.0 credit hours)

NOTE: Not counted in the 16-course Arts and Science Music major or the core courses in the B.Mus. degree.

 

History of Rock & Roll Since 1970

MUSI 3200 B
3.0 Credit Hours

This course is designed to give the student a historical overview of the development of rock ‘n roll from its roots up until the end of the 60’s.  This will be presented in a chronological manner, beginning with a brief overview of rock ‘n roll’s ancestors and influences.   It will go on to study the musical and cultural melting pot of the 1950’s, followed by the effects of the British Invasion of the 60’s.   A discussion of developments occurring in North America following the British Invasion will be the culminating point of this class

Prerequisite: 15 university-level courses (a minimum of 45.0 credit hours)

Equivalent: Music 3200 – History of Rock and Roll: 1968-1990

NOTE: Not counted in the 16-course Arts and Science Music major or the core courses in the B.Mus. degree.

NOTE: Students with credit in Music 2850 (History of Rock ‘n Roll), 2850 (3850) (Popular Music in the 20th Century) or 3010 cannot receive credit for the same offering in the Music 3200 series.

NOTE: Credit is not allowed for MUSI 3200 – History of Rock and Roll, and either of MUSI 3200 - History of Rock and Roll: 1948-1970 or MUSI 3200 – History of Rock and Roll: 1968-1990.

Games in Human History

New Media 3850 A
3.0 Credit Hours

This course provides a historical survey of games and the evolution of games across time and through various cultures, beginning with ancient board games (3500 BC) and ending with modern board, video, card, and war games. The course will cover the various functions which games have served (entertainment, gambling, status, competition) as well as the long-standing human interest in play, chance, rules, and competition. Emphasis will be placed on the evolution of games throughout history, the application of key technologies which have been used to create games (wood working, metallurgy, glass/stone work, paper and printing, electronics and computing), and the social structures and fandom which coalesce around games. An overarching goal will be to illustrate the similarities between ancient and modern forms of games, including the reasons and motivations which have throughout history drove humans to create and experiment with games.

Prerequisite(s): Third-year standing (a minimum of 60.0 credit hours)

 

Mobile Application Deveopment

New Media 3850 B
3.0 Credit Hours
 
An exploration of the concepts and practices related to the design and development of applications for mobile devices, including smartphones and tablets.
 
Prerequisites: Second-year standing (30.0 credit hours)