Topics Courses

A topics course is one that is not regularly offered at the University of Lethbridge. Departments may use topics courses to try out a new course that they are considering regularizing, or for faculty to offer courses related to their research. You may take multiple topics courses for credit as long as each offering is distinct (i.e. having significantly different titles).

If you have any questions about topics courses, please contact the Fine Arts Advising Office (W660).

Spring 2019 Topics Courses

Digital Fabrication

ART 3015 A
3 Credit Hours
 
A beginners-level introduction to techniques and concepts of art production through computer-aided design and fabrication. Students will be introduced to 2D/3D modelling software, CNC (computer-numerical control) machining, and 3D printing methods. An emphasis will be placed on exploring critical and creative ways of combining digital design and fabrication with drawing, painting, photography, sculpture, and/or installation.

Prerequisites: One of Art 3005, Art 3006, Art 3010, Art 3023, Art 3027, Art 3033, Art 3060, or Art 3061.

 

Advanced Studio

ART 3040
6 Credit Hours

The following instructors will be available as supervising faculty members for the above mentioned classes in Spring 2019:

  • Annie Martin
  • Mary Kavanagh
  • David Miller

Students who register for these courses will interview with each of the supervising faculty members to determine which faculty member will be their instructor of record.  Students must ensure they are registered in the correct section of the course with their assigned instructor by the end of the add/drop period.

 

Landmarks 2019: (Spatial Storytelling: Land, Art, Place and Community)

ART 3850
3 Credit Hours
 

In the Spring of 2019, students are invited to enroll in a specialized course with a focus on creating new, site-specific artworks in a range of interdisciplinary artistic practices. Working on-site at Fort Whoop-Up in Indian Battle Park (Lethbridge, Treaty 7–Blackfoot Territory) students will take inspiration from the rich cultural history of this heritage site, while creating artworks that will be installed on-location. Artworks created in this course will be included in a major exhibition to take place in June 2019. Students in the course will meet with Blackfoot knowledge keepers, contemporary artists from the community, as well as work together in a unique, collaborative capacity which will be inspired and enframed by Indigenous ways of knowing, being, sharing, learning and creating.

Prerequisites: 15 university level courses including a minimum of two Art Studio courses at the 3000 or 4000 level

Equivalent to Art 3850 - Landmarks 2017

 

Senior Studio

ART 4048 & 4049
6 Credit Hours

The following instructors will be available as supervising faculty members for the above mentioned classes in Spring 2019:

  • Annie Martin
  • Mary Kavanagh
  • David Miller

Students who register for these courses will interview with each of the supervising faculty members to determine which faculty member will be their instructor of record.  Students must ensure they are registered in the correct section of the course with their assigned instructor by the end of the add/drop period.

 

History of Photography

ARHI 3151 N
3 Credit Hours

This is a historical thematic introduction to the history of photography. We will discuss a wide variety of approaches to the medium so as to consider how and why photography has become such a fundamental visual communcative medium over the past 160 years. Art-related photography will be central, but the class will also deal with photography situated in the broader culture. Photography is a constant in our everyday life, and this course will concentrate on deciphering the significance of these images that surround us.

Prerequisite(s): One of Art History 1000 or third-year standing (a minimum of 60.0 credit hours)

Equivalent: Art History/Museum Studies 3151 (prior to 2016/2017)

 

Art and Activism (Series)

ARHI 4150 A
3 Credit Hours

Prerequisites: One course (3.0 credit hours) in Art History at the 3000 level

Introduction to Curating

MSTU 2850 A
3 Credit Hours

This course will introduce students to the role of the curator and the process of exhibition making. Students will learn the practical aspects of curating by mounting two exhibitions at the Dr. James Foster Penny Building in downtown Lethbridge. The course will be a combination of hands-on experience in the gallery combined with course readings and discussion.

Prerequisites: ARHI 1000 or ARHI 2225

 

Mask Making

Drama 3821 A
3 Credit Hours

An exploration into how masks have historically, culturally and stylistically been used combined with an introduction to the basic concepts, methods, materials and skills of mask making, with emphasis on practical theatrical masks.

Prerequisites: 15 university-level courses (a minimum of 45.0 credit hours) and completion of one course in Art, Drama, Music or New Media.

Recommended background: DRAM 2810

 

Design: Special Effects

Drama 3845 A
3 Credit Hours

This course is designed to focus on the atypical parts of theatrical production; the elements you might not learn about in a standard design class. Focal points could range from lighting and projection effects, to blood and props effects.

Prerequisites: As per calendar

 

Speech Communication II

Drama 3850 Y

3 Credit Hours

Building on the skills and experience of Drama 2350, this course is designed to expand and deepen the students' ability and facility with speech communication.  It is an entirely studio-based course which focuses on exploring a variety of modes of communication. Through plenty of practice and experiential learning, students will enhance the capacity to speak effectively and affectively before an audience.  

Prerequisites: Drama 2350 or Third-year Standing (a minimum of 60.0 credit hours)

Popular Music and the "Cover" (Popular Music History)

Music 3080 A
3 Credit Hours

This course will approach the widespread practice of the “cover song” in popular music, from a diverse range of perspectives. Issues of race, musical style, production values, intellectual property, authenticity, and commerce, among many others, are all implicated in a thorough consideration of this particular form of musical borrowing. Through assigned readings, in-class lectures and discussions, and self-directed study, students will gain an introduction not only to this topic, but also to the breadth of research methodologies employed in the study of popular music.

Prerequisites: Two (2) of: MUSI 3090, MUSI 3480, MUSI 3580

History of Jazz

Music 3200
3 Credit Hours

This course provides a comprehensive overview of jazz history, covering the major jazz styles and important musicians that have pioneered this music. We will trace jazz from its infancy, beginning in New Orleans and will highlight how this music has developed through the years and has grown into various sub-genres. Some of the styles that will be covered include: Early Jazz, the Swing Era, Bebop, Cool, Fusion and Modern jazz.Other important topics will include learning important jazz terminology, becoming acquainted with the preeminent jazz artists from each style, and most importantly, analyzing how jazz has evolved since the early twentieth-century. We will connect the important stylistic periods of the past and trace the various directions these trends have gone since. This course will provide students the opportunity to broaden their understanding and appreciation of this diverse music form.

Prerequisite: 15 university-level courses (a minimum of 45.0 credit hours)

NOTE: Not counted in the 16-course Arts and Science Music major or the core courses in the B.Mus. degree.

 

History of Rock & Roll Since 1970

MUSI 3200 B
3 Credit Hours

This course is meant to be a follow‑up course to the History of Rock Music (1948‑1969).  It will cover the fragmentation of rock 'n' roll styles through the seventies and eighties and nineties, beginning with the trends of the late sixties, through the mass marketing of the early seventies, moving to the technological boom that characterized much of eighties rock and roll, and ending with rock alternatives and Alternative rock and roll from the nineties.

Prerequisite: 15 university-level courses (a minimum of 45.0 credit hours)

Equivalent: Music 3200 – History of Rock and Roll: 1968-1990

NOTE: Not counted in the 16-course Arts and Science Music major or the core courses in the B.Mus. degree.

NOTE: Students with credit in Music 2850 (History of Rock ‘n Roll), 2850 (3850) (Popular Music in the 20th Century) or 3010 cannot receive credit for the same offering in the Music 3200 series.

NOTE: Credit is not allowed for MUSI 3200 – History of Rock and Roll, and either of MUSI 3200 - History of Rock and Roll: 1948-1970 or MUSI 3200 – History of Rock and Roll: 1968-1990. 

 

Classical Demo Recording

Music 3850 A
3 Credit Hours

This course focuses on classical recording production, including score annotation and producing techniques. The main emphasis will be placed on artistic direction and digital editing. This course is open to both DAA and music students – Every student will be on charge of a recording session and its digital editing (as a performer or as a producer). For every session, all students will practice critical listening and score annotation, and will learn new production techniques through observation.

Assessment combines evaluation of the session that students are in charge of (preparation, communication and editing), a reading assignment about classical production, a final critical listening test, score annotation progress throughout the semester, and class participation.

Class meetings: Both in the Recital Hall and Studio 1 (W700J) on Tuesdays 6:30-9:20pm.

Prerequisite(s): Music 3448 or Music 3630 AND permission of the instructor

The Horror Genre

Cinema 3850 A
3 Credit Hours

This course will examine the multiple facets of the cinematic Horror Genre, from the silent film era to the reflexive, pop-cultural practices of the current industry. Each module will focus on a largely influential section within the development of the genre, including illusionist experimentation and expressionism, monsters and gothic melodrama, socio-political rage, misogynistic practice and exploitation, political commentary and allegory, and gender and culturally driven narratives and reflexive practice.

Prerequisite(s): Cinema 1000 or 15 university-level course (a minimum of 45.0 credit hours)

 

Mobile Application Development

New Media 3850 A
3 Credit Hours

An exploration of the concepts and practices related to the design and development of applications for mobile devices, including smartphones and tablets.

Prerequisite(s): Second-year standing (30.0 credit hours)

 

Digital Consumer Culture

New Media 3850 Y (Calgary Campus)
3 Credit Hours

This seminar will explore how pervasive digital technologies are transforming consumerism, advertising, and user experience, as well as the physical design of consumer and work environments. Specific topics and case studies will be investigated through a critical and theoretical lens, to shed light on broader themes.

Prerequisite: Third-year standing (a minimum of 60.0 credit hours)