Government Information

Canada

United Kingdom
United States
Other Countries
International Organizations (IGOs)
Non-government Organizations (NGOs)
HELP With Citing/Finding Government Documents

Collections

Indexes/Databases

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CANADA

Federal Government

General

Legislation/Parliament

Statistics

Business

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Alberta Provincial Government

Other Provincial Governments

Municipal Government

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UNITED KINGDOM

General

Legislation/Parliament

Statistics

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UNITED STATES

General

Legislation/Congress

Statistics

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OTHER COUNTRIES

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INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS (IGOs)

United Nations

European Union

Other Organizations

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NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS (NGOs)

NGOs (non-governmental organizations) are private non-profit organizations that focus on government related topics such as agriculture, the status of women, economic indicators, etc.

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HELP WITH CITING/FINDING GOVERNMENT DOCUMENTS

Citing Government Documents

General Search Strategies

Questions to Ask Yourself

  1. Which government department would deal with a question or problem like this? [Identify the likely department first and then use the "Search" function on the department's home page to locate specific topics of interest.]
  2. Is this an "official" government website? [There is no fool-proof way to know how "official" a website is but government departments do often have a standardized domain name such as ".gov" or ".gc.ca" in their Internet address - you can try limiting your topic/subject based web searches to these domains in order to retrieve only government websites.]
  3. Would government sources be a good place to find statistics? [Whenever you locate useful statistics, check the citation at the bottom of the table to identify the source in order to extend your research further.] What can I do to locate specific documents when I have found "incomplete" citations? [Be prepared for many ambiguous citations when dealing with governmental information. Sometimes the best approach is to search a related index/database by keyword for the bits of information that you do have (e.g., "Chapter A-2" or "Bulletin 1425-19") which can often lead you either directly to the specific document in question or something that will at least make a reference to the full title of the document. Often "Statistics Canada" will be the only citation given and then the challenge is to search for something like: "Statistics Canada" and "_ _" (with " _ _ " being the topic of interest) in order to locate the specific source of your information.]


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 Content Revised: February 27, 2014


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