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The read-aloud as a primary experience

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dc.contributor.advisor Chambers, Cynthia
dc.contributor.author Langmuir, Gayla
dc.contributor.author University of Lethbridge. Faculty of Education
dc.date.accessioned 2010-03-18T20:35:29Z
dc.date.available 2010-03-18T20:35:29Z
dc.date.issued 2003
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10133/934
dc.description v, 62 leaves ; 29 cm. -- en
dc.description.abstract The act of teachers reading aloud to children has become an increasingly common experience as more teachers use literature-based reading instruction. This study examines the significance of the Read-Aloud in a primary classroom through a phenomenological account. It includes a brief history of phenomenology as a research method into pedagogic practice. The lived experience of the Read-Aloud is analyzed through the six research activities recommended by van Manen (1990) in the book Researching Li1'ed Experience. Audio taped read-aloud sessions in a grade one / two classroom are combined with adult memories of being read to. Four themes emerge as essential to the experience of the Read-Aloud in a primary classroom. These themes are: pleasure, enhanced vocabulary, the ability to move beyond the here and now through imagination and an increased understanding of the real world. The study concludes with a discussion of the responsibility of the pedagogue in light of what was discovered about the experience of the Read-Aloud. en
dc.language.iso en_US en
dc.publisher Lethbridge, Alta. : University of Lethbridge, Faculty of Education, 2003 en
dc.relation.ispartofseries Project (University of Lethbridge. Faculty of Education) en
dc.subject Oral reading en
dc.subject Reading (Elementary) en
dc.title The read-aloud as a primary experience en
dc.type Thesis en
dc.publisher.faculty Education en

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