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Five teachers, five fingers, five narratives

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dc.contributor.advisor Hasebe-Ludt, Erika
dc.contributor.author Roberts, Caroline A
dc.contributor.author University of Lethbridge. Faculty of Education
dc.date.accessioned 2010-03-17T21:19:50Z
dc.date.available 2010-03-17T21:19:50Z
dc.date.issued 2000
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10133/890
dc.description vii, 128 leaves ; 29 cm. -- en
dc.description.abstract This project will attempt to make pedagogical connections between aspects of contemporary autobiographical theory through teacher stories in the development of individual identity presented in an aesthetic and artistic manner. The project is about writing and sharing, making connections, building, and fostering our own identity as individuals. Comments throughout the project are included as they happened as a part of the overall process. It is not my intent to analyze or interpret each group member's ideas, but to share them as well as document how the process evolved. The goal was to allow all the participants, including myself, a medium to show how this process affected each of us and how we developed an identity. Five teachers, including myself, reflected on their teaching practice by writing narratives based on the five forms indicated by Preskill (1998) in Narratives of Teaching and the Quest for the Second Self). In this project, each teacher wrote one narrative based on one of the different forms highlighted in Preskill's article, which include narrative of social criticism, narrative of apprenticeship, narrative of reflective practice, narrative of journey, and narrative of hope. This project utilized a type of action research where participants were involved in reflecting, writing and sharing stories formed from teaching experiences. This sharing process aided in the recognition of identity and identity formation. My main objective was to allow each member to gain personal insights about her development as an individual and teacher. All members of the group were instrumental in offering each other support, reflection, and an arena to discuss the successes and failures in each other's career. Each member was an important contributor to the project and to the narratives of each person taking part in the project. The goal was to provide living action research about identity formation. I hope this project aided these teachers in a journey of identity exploration. This exploration allowed them to look at the influences in their lives as experiences they must embrace, write about, reflect upon, grow with and learn from as they continue to construct and reconstruct who they are as individuals, teachers, professionals, and women. Presentation of each member's narratives was also something that I wanted to develop, to allow for each member's uniqueness to become directly incorporated with their narrative. This was done through fmgerprints. Each member of the group chose a print from their left, or feminine, hand to transcribe their story into. This would allow each story to be unique to the individual, an expression of the person, the teacher, the woman. I felt that this was their own unique personal expression of their, and only their story. As the fingerprints are individual, so are the stories of the women of the group. en
dc.language.iso en_US en
dc.publisher Lethbridge, Alta. : University of Lethbridge, Faculty of Education, 2000 en
dc.relation.ispartofseries Project (University of Lethbridge. Faculty of Education) en
dc.subject Teachers -- Canada en
dc.subject Women teachers -- Canada en
dc.title Five teachers, five fingers, five narratives en
dc.type Thesis en
dc.publisher.faculty Education en


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