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The Alamo as a Pyrrhic Victory: The Mexican Experience in the Battle of the Alamo

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dc.contributor.author Matyszczyk, Stephanie
dc.date.accessioned 2007-09-27T14:55:36Z
dc.date.available 2007-09-27T14:55:36Z
dc.date.issued 2007-01
dc.identifier.citation Matyszczyk, Stephanie (2007). The Alamo as a Pyrrhic Victory: The Mexican Experience in the Battle of the Alamo. Lethbridge Undergraduate Research Journal, 1(2). en
dc.identifier.issn 1718-8482
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10133/477
dc.description.abstract At the Battle of San Jacinto, General Sam Houston said "Remember the Alamo!" The question however is how should we remember it? Do we remember it as the American icon of freedom and liberty that has forever idolized figures such as Davy Crockett, James Bowie, and William Barret Travis? Before this question can be answered, one must first have a more precise understanding of what occurred at the Alamo. This can only be gained by looking at the battle from not only the side of the Texan rebels, but the Mexican troops as well. Little focus has been given to the experience of the Mexicans who were present at the siege. This raises the question of how does the story of what occurred at the Alamo differ when seen through the point of view of these participants. The historical trend has been to focus on the events of the siege of the Alamo through the experiences of its defenders. It is by focusing on the events of the Battle of the Alamo through the experience of the Mexican troops in addition to the experiences of the Texan rebels, that we can be able to gain a better understanding of not only the battle itself, but also be able to see why the Mexicans viewed the Battle of the Alamo as a Pyrrhic victory. Also, by answering this question, insight can be gained into how the outcome of the Battle of the Alamo affected Santa Anna and his troops throughout the rest of the Texas campaign, because it was the "loss" that the troops felt they suffered that brought down their morale and affected their motivation to fight later on in the Texan campaign, thus leading to their loss at San Jacinto. Hence, by examining the Mexican primary sources concerned with the Battle of the Alamo I propose that there was no real victory for the Mexican armies, and that the call for battle in the "Remember the Alamo!" that Houston initiated was a straw man effectively manipulated for many years. en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Lethbridge Undergraduate Research Journal en
dc.subject San Jacinto, Battle of, Tex., 1836 en
dc.subject Alamo (San Antonio, Tex.) en
dc.title The Alamo as a Pyrrhic Victory: The Mexican Experience in the Battle of the Alamo en
dc.type Article en
dc.publisher.faculty Adelphi University en
dc.publisher.institution Adelphi University, Garden City NY USA en

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