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A bloody offal nuisance: The persistence of private slaughter-houses in nineteenth century London

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dc.contributor.author MacLachlan, Ian
dc.date.accessioned 2007-06-29T19:25:28Z
dc.date.available 2007-06-29T19:25:28Z
dc.date.issued 2007-08
dc.identifier.citation MacLachlan, I. (2007). A bloody offal nuisance: The persistence of private slaughter-houses in nineteenth century London. Urban History, 34(2), 227-254. en
dc.identifier.issn 0963-9268
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10133/329
dc.description http://journals.cambridge.org/ en
dc.description.abstract British slaughter-house reformers campaigned to abolish private urban slaughter-houses and establish public abattoirs in the nineteenth century. Abolition of London’s private slaughter-houses was motivated by the congestion created by livestock in city streets, the nuisance of slaughter-house refuse in residential neighbourhoods and public health concerns about diseased meat in the food supply. The butchers successfully defended their private slaughter-houses, illustrating the persistence of the craftsman’s workshop and the importance of laissez-faire sentiments in opposition to municipalization in Victorian London. en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Cambridge University Press en
dc.subject Slaughtering and slaughter-houses – London (England) en
dc.subject London (England) -- Slaughtering and slaughter-houses en
dc.title A bloody offal nuisance: The persistence of private slaughter-houses in nineteenth century London en
dc.type Article en
dc.publisher.faculty Arts and Science en
dc.publisher.department Geography en
dc.description.peer-review Yes en
dc.publisher.institution University of Lethbridge en

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