Institutional Repository

Modelling the potential impacts of climate change on snowpack in the St. Mary River watershed, Montana

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Byrne, James
dc.contributor.author MacDonald, Ryan J
dc.contributor.author University of Lethbridge. Faculty of Arts and Science
dc.date.accessioned 2011-08-19T19:20:22Z
dc.date.available 2011-08-19T19:20:22Z
dc.date.issued 2008
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10133/2511
dc.description viii, 93 leaves ; 29 cm en_US
dc.description.abstract Climate change poses significant threats to mountain ecosystems in North America (Barnett et al., 2005) and will subsequently impact water supply for human and ecosystem use. To assess these threats, we must have an understanding of the local variability in hydrometeorological conditions over the mountains. This thesis describes the continued development and application of a fine scale spatial hydrometeorological model, GENESYS (GENerate Earth SYstems Science input). The GENESYS model successfully simulated daily snowpack values for a 10 year trial period and annual runoff volumes for a thirty year period. Based on the results of these simulations the model was applied to estimate potential changes in snowpack over the St. Mary River watershed, Montana. GCM derived future climate scenarios were applied, representing a range of emissions controls and applied to perturb the 1961-90 climate record using the “delta” downscaling technique. The effects of these changes in climate were assessed for thirty year time slices centered on 2020s, 2050s, and 2080s. The GENESYS simulations of future climate showed that mountain snowpack was highly vulnerable to changes in temperature and to a lesser degree precipitation. A seasonal shift to an earlier onset of spring melt and an increase in the ratio of rain to snow occurred under all climate change scenarios. Results of mean and maximum snowpack were more variable and appeared to be highly dependent on scenario selection. The results demonstrated that although annual volume of available water from snowpack may increase, the seasonal distribution of available water may be significantly altered. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Lethbridge, Alta. : University of Lethbridge, Dept. of Geography, c2008 en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Thesis (University of Lethbridge. Faculty of Arts and Science) en_US
dc.subject Snowpack augmentation -- Montana -- St. Mary River Basin en_US
dc.subject Climatic changes en_US
dc.subject Global warming en_US
dc.subject Snow -- Montana -- St. Mary River Basin en_US
dc.subject Runoff -- Montana -- St. Mary River Basin en_US
dc.subject St. Mary River Basin (Montana) en_US
dc.subject Rocky Mountains -- Montana -- Climate en_US
dc.subject Dissertations, Academic en_US
dc.title Modelling the potential impacts of climate change on snowpack in the St. Mary River watershed, Montana en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.publisher.faculty Arts and Science en_US
dc.publisher.department Department of Geography en_US

Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Related Items

Search DSpace


Advanced Search

Browse

My Account

Statistics