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Age in grade one and academic success

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dc.contributor.advisor Townsend, David
dc.contributor.author Wheeler, Grieg
dc.contributor.author University of Lethbridge. Faculty of Education
dc.date.accessioned 2010-03-23T19:58:08Z
dc.date.available 2010-03-23T19:58:08Z
dc.date.issued 2004
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10133/1017
dc.description viii, 67 leaves ; 29 cm. -- en
dc.description.abstract Alberta provincial legislation allows each School District to establish a specific cut-off date, within a given range, that regulates when a student may start Grade one. A child must turn six years of age between September 15t and February 28th of the school year. The range of start dates granted by the Provincial Government spans 180 days. It would be reasonable to anticipate that this range could have a direct impact on almost fifty percent of the student population. Given family mobility, children are able to start school in one jurisdiction and move to another jurisdiction often with no regard for the age of entry. If a child moved from a district with a February 28 cut-off date, to a district with a September 1 cut-off date, the age difference between two students in the same class could be as extreme as one day short of 18 months! This study presents quantitative research that examines the question, "Does the age of entry into grade 1 have an influence on the academic success of students at the conclusion of their first year in grade 3." Provincial Achievement Test results in Language Arts and Math of 40 grade 3 students have been examined to determine relationships between age of school entry into grade 1 as well as achievement between genders. Contrary to previous studies, age has little effect on achievement. Among the 21 girls in the group, younger students outperformed their older classmates, yet not at a statistically significant level. Among the 19 boys in the group, older students outperformed their old younger classmates, yet not at a statistically significant level. Gender achievement appears to be a greater issue than does the difference in age. en
dc.language.iso en_US en
dc.publisher Lethbridge, Alta. : University of Lethbridge, Faculty of Education, 2004 en
dc.relation.ispartofseries Project (University of Lethbridge. Faculty of Education) en
dc.subject School age (Entrance age) -- Alberta -- Case studies en
dc.subject Readiness for school -- Alberta -- Case studies en
dc.subject Academic achievement -- Alberta -- Evaluation en
dc.title Age in grade one and academic success en
dc.type Thesis en
dc.publisher.faculty Education en


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