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Browsing by Author "Wetmore, Stacey"

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Browsing by Author "Wetmore, Stacey"

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  • Churchill, Cassandra D.M (Lethbridge, Alta. : University of Lethbridge, Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry, c2011Arts and ScienceDepartment of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2011)
    Using computational methods, the formation pathways and structures of four experimentally-observed DNA intrastrand cross-links are determined. These lesions originate from the uracil radical and are of particular importance ...
  • Przybylski, Jennifer L.; University of Lethbridge. Faculty of Arts and Science (Lethbridge, Alta. : University of Lethbridge, Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry, c2009Arts and ScienceDepartment of Chemistry, 2009)
    The mechanism for the hydrolysis of 2′-deoxyribonucleosides is examined using computational chemistry techniques. Initially, a model capable of accurately predicting the mechanism and activation barrier for the uncatalyzed ...
  • Chhikara, Aditya (Lethbridge, Alta. : University of Lethbridge, Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2010Arts and ScienceDepartment of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2010)
    Stacking interactions, also known as π-π or face-to-face interactions, occur between molecules whose π bonds are in parallel planes. They are used to design self-assembling structures in nanotechnology, influence organic ...
  • Millen, Andrea (Lethbridge, Alta. : University of Lethbridge, Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry, c2011Arts and ScienceDepartment of Chemistry & Biochemistry, 2011)
    DNA damage is important to understand since it has the potential to lead to disease if unrepaired. In particular, bulky C8 guanine adducts (addition products) are known to induce a variety of mutations due to their ...
  • Rutledge, Lesley R; University of Lethbridge. Faculty of Arts and Science (Lethbridge, Alta. : University of Lethbridge, Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry, c2011Arts and ScienceDepartment of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2011)
    This thesis concentrates on understanding how individual nonspecific DNA–protein contacts are used in the excision mechanism of the human DNA repair enzyme, alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG). Initially, studies focus ...