Online Courses

How will you spend your summer?

Online courses available!

Study from the convenience of your home! This is a great opportunity for you to take summer courses and move ahead in your degree.

Online courses are very popular and fill quickly, so register as soon as you can. We just added a new section of Geography 2000 in Summer Session 1. Our summer courses are in demand and as such, we are looking at ways to accommodate more students this summer. For example, we are looking at offering new courses and sections. Stay tuned!

Summer Session I/II/III (May-August)

  • PHIL 2210: Philosophy of Religion (Recommended background: PHIL 1000)
    Credit Hours: 3.00
    We make use of analytical resources found in present-day cosmology, formal semantics, decision theory and other branches of natural science. Issues to be examined usually include God’s nature, the problem of evil, the rationality and prudence of religious belief and the alleged conflict between religion and science.
    Recommended Background: Philosophy 1000
    Attributes: Fine Arts and Humanities
     
  • SPAN 1000: Beginners’ Spanish I (students must be available for two of the three weekly sessions)
    Credit Hours: 3.00
    Fundamentals of spoken and written Spanish.
    Attributes: Fine Arts and Humanities
    Note: For students with little or no knowledge of Spanish. To confirm enrolment and placement, all students must complete the Spanish Student Information Form and then, if required, the placement test, before the first day of classes. Credit for Spanish 1000 will not normally be granted to students with Spanish 30-3Y, 20-6Y, 30-6Y, 10-9Y, 20-9Y, 30-9Y, or equivalent. Students may be able to take this course for credit with permission of the Department of Modern Languages if high school Spanish courses were completed more than five years ago.

Summer Session I (May-June)

  • PSYC 3850: Psychology of Education (New Course - Added April 22, 2020)
    Credit Hours: 3.00
    By definition, psychology includes the study of information processing, or how people think. For over 40 years, the field has carried out research into thinking and developed models about how we process information. For many reasons (inertia, reward structures, politics etc.), too little of this research has been used to inform teaching and learning practices in education. This module will explore the principles contained in research findings from psychology, and various solutions will be considered for problems in education based on these principles.
    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100
    Attributes: Social Sciences
     
  • JPST 3400: Japanese Society and Culture (New Course - Added April 17, 2020)
    Credit Hours: 3.00
    Exploration of Japanese society and culture from pre-modern to present-day encompassing a range of different theoretical perspectives from history, education, religion, food, language, holidays, pop culture, family, modernization, and subcultures.
    Prerequisite(s): 15 university-level courses (a minimum of 45.0 credit hours)
    Equivalent: Modern Languages 2850 (Japanese Society and Culture) (prior to 2016/2017)
    Attributes: Humanities
     
  • ENGL 2720: Approaches to Indigenous Literature (New Course - Added April 16, 2020)
    Credit Hours: 3.00
    How does one approach Indigenous literature? Using a range of contemporary Indigenous texts (Two-Spirit poetry, CBC Massey Lecture, memoir, young adult fiction), and learning from some of Canada’s leading Indigenous writers, this course will familiarize students with an array of focal points to consider when approaching and thinking about Indigenous literature.
    Attributes: Humanities
     
  • GEOG 2000: World Regional Geography (New Section - Added April 14, 2020)
    Credit Hours: 3.00
    Contact hours per week: 3-0-0
    The course is organized around major world regions. It introduces students to the process of global integration and provides insights into the functional relations that characterize this integration. Environmental concerns, global population and resources, the emergence of trading blocs and growing dependency are covered within the framework of the regional organization.
    Attributes: Social Science
     
  • INDG 1000: Introduction to Indigenous Studies
    Credit Hours: 3.00
    Survey of Indigenous Studies as a discipline focusing upon themes such as Indigenous arts, politics, languages, and histories.
    Equivalent: Native American Studies 1000 (prior to 2019/2020)
    Attributes: Fine Arts and Humanities
  • SOCI 2500: Deviance, Conformity and Social Control (prereq: SOCI 1000 or a previous course in Sociology)
    Credit Hours: 3.00
    Normative processes by which deviance is constructed with a particular focus on power as both implicated in, and the outcome of, these processes.
    Prerequisite(s): One of Sociology 1000 or a previous course (3.0 credit hours) in Sociology
    Attributes: Social Science
  • HIST 3850: Main Themes in Western Environmental History (prereq: HIST 1000 or 1200)
    Credit Hours: 3.00
    Exploration of environmental change and the multi-faceted relationship between human beings and their natural surroundings, from pre-European contact to the 20thcentury. Special attention will be given to the Canadian and American west. Features topics on popular culture (Star Wars and Star Trek) and advertising.
    Attributes: Humanities
  • PSYC 3850: Language Evolution and Cognition (prereq: PSYC 1000)
    Credit Hours: 3.00
    Exploration of the relationship between language and cognition, with special attention paid to evolution. Topics include the evolutionary continuity of human and animal communication systems and cutting edge experimental techniques exploring the evolution and spread of language around the world.
    Attributes: Science & Social Science

Summer Session II/III (July-August)

  • ENGL: Storytelling, Theory & Practice (New Course - Added April 24, 2020)
    Credit Hours: 3.00
    This course is designed to introduce students to the theory and practice of storytelling. Through the investigation of five common critical approaches to literature as well as story structure and storytelling practice, students will gain a deeper understanding of storytelling as a form. Students will be asked to exercise creativity through online group work and presentations.
    Prerequisite(s): One of English 1900 or a previous course (3.0 credit hours) in English 
    Note: May be used to meet "Genres, Approaches and Themes" list requirement for the major in English.
    Attributes: Social Science
     
  • PSYC 3850: Health Psychology (New Course - Added April 21, 2020)
    Credit Hours: 3.00
    This course will provide a critical survey of the research and theory on the relationship between psychological factors and health. Topics will include health behaviours (enhancing and compromising), stress, pain, chronic illness, and well-being.
    Attributes: Social Science
     
  • SOCI 3850: Applied Sociology: Academic Freedoms Advocacy Seminar (New Course - Added April 16, 2020)
    Credit Hours: 3.00
    Sociology of human rights, academic freedoms, theories of social change, and critical criminology. Development of human rights research and advocacy skills through direct engagement with cases of at-risk scholars from around the world currently facing unjust restrictions, prosecution, or imprisonment, in cooperation with Scholars at Risk (SAR) Network’s Academic Freedom Monitoring Project and Scholars in Prison Project.
    Attributes: Social Science
     
  • INDG 1000: Introduction to Indigenous Studies (New Section - Added April 14, 2020)
    Credit Hours: 3.00
    Survey of Indigenous Studies as a discipline focusing upon themes such as Indigenous arts, politics, languages, and histories.
    Equivalent: Native American Studies 1000 (prior to 2019/2020)
    Attributes: Fine Arts and Humanities
     
  • POLI 3750: Political Humor: Power and Resistance
    Credit Hours: 3.00
    Consideration of the ways political humour, including fiction, political cartoons, sketch comedy, stand-up, satirical news, and memes, shape politicians’ images and influence election debates. How social movements related to gender, race, and nation use humour as a form of resistance. Examples from the Canadian and American political contexts.
    Attributes: Social Science
     
  • WRIT 1000: Introduction to Academic Writing
    Credit Hours: 3.00
    This course is designed to develop skills in critical reading and writing at the university level. The course includes the critical reading of assigned texts and an introduction to expository writing, including description, analysis, persuasion and other strategies of academic discourse. Special attention will be paid throughout to conventions of English usage.
    Substantially Similar: Writing 1200; Writing 1850 (Writing for Engineering Students) (prior to 2019/2020)
    Attributes: Fine Arts and Humanities
    Note: This course may NOT be included among the 13 courses required for the major in English for the B.A., BASc., or B.A./B.Mgt., or for the major in English/English Language Arts Education for the B.A./B.Ed. This course does NOT satisfy the prerequisite for 2000-level courses in English.
     
  • GEOG 2000: World Regional Geography
    Credit Hours: 3.00
    Contact hours per week: 3-0-0
    The course is organized around major world regions. It introduces students to the process of global integration and provides insights into the functional relations that characterize this integration. Environmental concerns, global population and resources, the emergence of trading blocs and growing dependency are covered within the framework of the regional organization.
    Attributes: Social Science