Using Academic Regulations to Your Advantage

Add/Drop
What if... I'm not in the classes I want at the beginning of the semester, or I want to change my schedule?

General Liberal Education Requirement (GLER)
What if... I am concerned about the General Liberal Education Requirement (GLER)? I am an English major, and I have not taken any University-level science courses. (Or I may be a science major, and I have not taken any University-level English courses!) Do I have to take such courses?

Credit/Non-Credit (Cr/NC)
What if... I want to take a course in a different field, but I'm worried that I might not do as well as I would like?

Withdrawal (W)
What if... I want to drop a class after the Add/Drop period has ended?

Withdrawal With Cause (WC)/Incomplete (I)
What if... I have an emergency and cannot complete or continue in my course(s)?

More Information
What if... I still have more questions about Academic Regulations and how they could apply to me?


What if... I'm not in the classes I want at the beginning of the semester, or I want to change my schedule?

ADD/DROP
Through the Add/Drop period, right to the end of the first week of classes (Fall or Spring semester), you can add and/or drop courses, labs, and tutorials without penalty until you get the schedule that is right for you and your program.

You can add and/or drop courses by using the Bridge in the same manner that you initially registered in your courses, or you can visit the Information Centre at the Registrar's Office and Student Services (ROSS) for help.


What if... I am concerned about the General Liberal Education Requirement (GLER)? I am an English major, and I have not taken any University-level science courses. (Or I may be a science major, and I have not taken any University-level English courses!) Do I have to take such courses?

GENERAL LIBERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENT (GLER)
All students must take at least a few courses from each of the Fine Arts/Humanities, Social Sciences, and the Sciences. But this is a good thing! The UofL was founded with a liberal arts philosophy, which means that the best education will include instruction in as broad a field of disciplines as possible.

With this philosophy in mind, the General Liberal Education Requirement (GLER) was established. Every undergraduate student at the UofL must complete the GLER, which is a 12-course requirement (36.0 credit hours). You must complete at least four courses (12.0 credit hours) from each of three lists:

List I: Fine Arts and Humanities (includes disciplines such as Art and History)
List II: Social Sciences (includes disciplines such as Anthropology and Sociology)
List III: Sciences (includes disciplines such as Astronomy and Geology)

The GLER is part of the overall degree program, and you can complete at least one of the lists just by completing courses in your major.

Many students are reluctant to take courses outside their major, but there is a wide variety of choices available within the three lists. For example, some Psychology courses are designated as Social Science while others are Science. Kinesiology courses can be found in each of the three lists. It is likely that a close examination of each list in the UofL Calendar will reveal something that appeals to you.

Note: Students in some Post-Diploma degree programs must complete a modified GLER.

If you are still concerned about taking courses to meet the GLER, you can always use the Credit/Non-Credit option. If you receive a 'Cr' in a course, it will still count toward the GLER. Besides, you may discover you have a budding scientist (or artist) lurking within!

Refer to Part 4 in the University of Lethbridge Calendar for complete details regarding the GLER.


What if... I want to take a course in a different field, but I'm worried that I might not do as well as I would like?

CREDIT/NON-CREDIT (Cr/NC)
Think of Credit/Non-Credit as the University's equivalent of Auto Insurance. If something goes wrong, your grade point average (GPA) is protected. If you are interested in taking a course but are worried that if you do poorly you will hurt your grade point average, then Credit/Non-Credit was made for you, because it was designed to help you expand your academic horizons while protecting your GPA.

When you designate a course as Credit/Non-Credit, you essentially have insured your GPA because you will not receive a letter grade in the course unless you receive a 'C' or higher.

If you get less than a 'C' but still pass the course, then a 'Cr' (Credit) will appear on your transcript. You still get credit for the course in your degree program, but a 'Cr' does not bring down your GPA.

If you fail the course, then 'NC' (Non-Credit) will appear on your transcript. This indicates that you did not receive credit for the course, but a 'NC' does not bring down your GPA.

What's the catch?
Well, you can only designate a course as Credit/Non-Credit at the Registrar's Office and Student Services (ROSS) on the two days following the Add/Drop period at the beginning of the semester. (Remember: Add/Drop ends on the fifth day of classes for Fall and Spring semesters.) After that time, the designation is not available.

Other limitations include the following:

  • You cannot use Cr/NC for courses in your major.*
  • Only two courses per semester may be designated as Cr/NC.
  • Depending on your program, there is a limit on the total number of Cr/NC designations you can use.
  • To be eligible for undergraduate scholarships you must have completed a minimum of eight graded semester courses (24.0 credit hours). Courses that receive a 'Cr' or 'NC' designation are not counted toward this minimum.
  • Students in transfer programs or who plan to further their schooling at other institutions should consider this Cr/NC option carefully. Other institutions may recognize 'Cr' as 'D' and 'NC' as 'F.'

*Please see Part 4 of the Calendar for other course exclusions.


What if... I want to drop a class after the Add/Drop period has ended?

WITHDRAWAL (W)
After Add/Drop you must withdraw from the course. In the Fall and Spring semesters, you can withdraw from individual courses until the ninth week of classes. If you withdraw from a course it will be noted with a 'W' on your transcript, with no impact on your GPA.

To withdraw from a course you need to fill out a form at the Registrar's Office and Student Services (ROSS). You may be eligible for a partial refund of your money depending on when you withdraw.

Please note: Summer Sessions have different withdrawal deadlines. Please see the Academic Schedule in the UofL Calendar.


What if... I have an emergency and cannot complete or continue in my course(s)?

WITHDRAWAL WITH CAUSE (WC)
In the event of a serious illness or circumstances beyond your control, such as a death in the family, you may be eligible for a 'Withdrawal With Cause.' You must apply to your Faculty/School Advising Office in order to receive a 'WC.' At the end of the semester, along with your other grades, you will see a 'WC' on your transcript for the withdrawn course. The 'WC' does not count against the limit of individual course withdrawals you are allowed, but you are assessed fees for that course in accordance with the University fee policy.

INCOMPLETE (I)
If you encounter serious illness or other circumstances beyond your control, and if you have finished most of the work in a class (or classes), you may be eligible for an 'Incomplete.' You must apply to your Faculty/School Advising Office during the last two weeks of classes in order to receive an 'I.' You should also discuss your situation with your instructor(s). Once you receive the approval of both your instructor(s) and the Dean/Director of your Faculty/School, you will be granted an 'Incomplete.' You will also be given a deadline by which you must complete the unfinished work. Until that work is completed and a grade submitted, or the deadline passes, an 'I' will appear on your transcript. If you find yourself in this situation go straight to your Advising Office for help.

Please note: In the case of both 'I' and 'WC' you will need documentation supporting your need for such a designation.


What if... I still have more questions about Academic Regulations and how they could apply to me?

The University of Lethbridge Calendar can answer most of your questions. For Academic Regulations, you especially want to read Part 4 - Academic Regulations, Policies and Program Requirements. This Part offers complete details on the regulations discussed above as well as additional information on grading, residence requirements, academic standards, and appeal processes.

If you do not have a Calendar, you can access it online.


All deadlines are listed in the Academic Schedule in the Calendar and on the Important Dates and Deadlines page of the Registrar's Office and Student Services (ROSS) website.

See Part 4 - Academic Regulations, Policies and Program Requirements of the Calendar for complete details on the Academic Regulations discussed above.