Program Planning


Geography (GEOG)

Geography (GEOG)
Faculty of Arts and Science


Geography 1010

Introduction to Geography
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-0-0
Geography is the science that deals with the physical and human characteristics of the earth's surface including patterns, processes, variation and change in time and space. A central goal of Geography is to understand the interrelationships between physical and human environments. Geographical techniques introduced include map, spatial, landscape and regional analysis, and Geographical Information Science.
Substantially Similar: Geography 1000 (prior to 2004/2005)

Geography 2000

World Regional Geography
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-0-0
The course is organized around major world regions. It introduces students to the process of global integration and provides insights into the functional relations that characterize this integration. Environmental concerns, global population and resources, the emergence of trading blocs and growing dependency are covered within the framework of the regional organization.

Geography 2015

Weather and Climate
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-1.5-0
Introduction to the atmosphere. Global circulation and the role of energy exchange. Structure and behaviour of world and regional weather systems. Synoptic meteorology. Bioclimatology. Climate variation and cycles.
Prerequisite(s): Geography 1010 (Geography 1000 prior to 2004/2005)

Geography 2030

Geomorphology
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-1.5-0
Other hours: 0-0-3
The scientific study of landforms comprising a spectrum of approaches from both historical and functional conceptual bases. Basic concepts covered in landform description and analysis are uniformity, evolution, complexity and systems.
Prerequisite(s): Geography 1010 (Geography 1000 prior to 2004/2005)

Geography 2210

Spatial Organization of Economic Activity
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-0-0
Other hours: 0-0-4
Neoclassical and contemporary perspectives on the geography of urban and economic activities. Topics covered include central place hierarchies, industrial location, agricultural and urban land use, transportation, spatial interaction and regional economic development. A four-hour field trip in the City of Lethbridge will be scheduled.
Prerequisite(s): Geography 1010 (Geography 1000 prior to 2004/2005)

Geography 2240

People and Places
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-0-0
Interrelationship among people, places and their environments. Topics covered include changing geographies of population, settlement patterns and resource use, ethnicity, class, gender, politics, and cultural landscapes.
Prerequisite(s): Geography 1010 (Geography 1000 prior to 2004/2005)
Substantially Similar: Geography 2200 (prior to 2004/2005)

Geography 2535

Introduction to Planning
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-0-0
Other hours: 0-0-8
A survey of urban, regional, resource and land use planning, history of urban design and planning concepts, legal and institutional framework for urban and regional planning, the planning process, contemporary planning issues at the community, metropolitan and regional scale. A one-day field trip will be scheduled on a Saturday.

Geography 2600

Canada
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-0-0
Physical environments, resources, economics and settlements of the regions of Canada.

Geography 2700

Geographical Data and Analysis
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-1.5-0
Introduction to quantitative methods and statistical problem-solving in geography. Unique features of geographical data. Introductory methods for analysis and description of areal and point data. Central tendency, dispersion and shape of distributions. Classification methods. Use of Normal, Binomial, and Poisson distributions in geographical analysis. Bivariate correlation and regression analysis. Computer applications in statistical problem-solving. Introduction to Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for geographic data visualization, analysis, and presentation.
Prerequisite(s): Geography 1010 (Geography 1000 prior to 2004/2005)

Geography 3015

Microclimatology
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-3-0
Climatology of the planetary boundary layer. An examination of the dynamic exchanges of radiation, energy, water, and carbon at the Earth-atmosphere interface. Topics addressed include: surface radiation balance, latent and sensible heat flux, air pollution in the boundary layer, carbon dynamics in agricultural and natural ecosystems, and implications of atmospheric change on land-atmosphere interactions and tropospheric climate.
Prerequisite(s): Geography 2015
Equivalent: Geography 3850 (Atmospheric Analysis) (prior to 2005/2006)

Geography 3035

Fluvial Geomorphology
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-3-0
A study of landforms and deposits created by running water. Aspects of drainage basin development, the measurement of drainage basin processes, concepts of drainage basin hydraulics and flood frequency analysis will be illustrated with field and computer-based laboratory exercises. The watershed will serve as the basic unit of study with emphasis on western Canadian river basins.
Prerequisite(s): Geography 2030

Geography 3060

Glaciology and Glacial Geomorphology
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-3-0
Other hours: 0-0-8
The study of perennial snow and ice and the effects of glaciers in the development of landforms. A one-day field trip will be scheduled on a Saturday.
Prerequisite(s): Geography 2030

Geography 3070

Hazards, Disasters and Global Change
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-0-0
The relationships of natural extremes, global environmental change and human systems. A key emphasis is identification of natural and human-induced global environmental change. Case studies demonstrating societal vulnerabilities to potential hazards and disasters.
Prerequisite(s): One of Geography 2015, Geography 2030, or Geology 2060;
Third-year standing (a minimum of 60.0 credit hours)

Geography 3075

Environmental Resources Management
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-0-0
This course considers the theory and methods of environmental assessment, adaptive management, and issues in resource analysis, allocation and development.
Prerequisite(s): Environmental Science 2000

Geography 3080

Soils
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-3-0
Other hours: 0-0-8
Physical, chemical, biological properties of soils; soil formation, classification and distribution, insights into the uses and abuses of soils, role of soil agronomy in resource development. A one-day field trip will be scheduled on a Saturday.
Prerequisite(s): One of Geography 2030, Geology 2060, or admission to the Post-Diploma B.A. or B.Sc. in Agricultural Studies
Equivalent: Geography 4050 (prior to 2004/2005)

Geography 3090

Biogeography
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-3-0
Other hours: 0-0-16
Geographic and spatial relationships of individuals, species, ecosystems, and biomes. Topics include biodiversity, dispersal, evolution and environmental change. Two eight-hour field excursions will be scheduled on Saturdays.
Prerequisite(s): Geography 1010 (Geography 1000 prior to 2004/2005);
One of Biology 1010 or Biology 1020
Equivalent: Geography 3850 (Biogeography) (prior to 2005/2006)

Geography 3210

Agricultural Geography
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-0-0
Other hours: 0-0-8
An examination of the nature and spatial complexion of agricultural systems in advanced, market economics. The course will focus on various physical, economic, social and institutional forces which influence the geography of agriculture. Examples and case studies will be drawn mainly from North America and Western Europe. A one-day field trip (or two half-days) will be scheduled on a Saturday.
Prerequisite(s): One of Geography 2210 or [Agricultural Studies 1000 and a previous course (3.0 credit hours) in Geography]

Geography 3225/Management 3660

Industrial Location and Globalization of Enterprise
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-0-0
Other hours: 0-0-8
Industrial geography is concerned with the location of industrial activity at local, continental and global scales of analysis. The course explores locational patterns and behaviour of small, medium-sized and transnational manufacturing firms with special emphasis on locational dynamics over time. By taking a geographical perspective, the course links the spatial behaviour of firms with economic development issues at the local, regional and global scales. A one-day field trip will be scheduled.
Prerequisite(s): One of Geography 2210 or Management 2030

Geography 3230

Urban Social Geography
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-0-0
Other hours: 0-0-12
Internal social geography of cities. Classical and contemporary approaches to the study of neighbourhood and community differentiation, social inequalities in the city, social segregation, social polarization, and urban social structure. Intra-urban variations in morphology, land use, crime, housing, deprivation, well-being, community conflict and community organizations. A full-day field trip may be scheduled on a weekend.
Prerequisite(s): Geography 2240

Geography 3235

Quantitative Models for Geographic Analysis
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-3-0
Other hours: 0-0-4
Quantitative methods applied to regional problems in both human and physical geography. Population projection, cohort survival methods, shift and share forecasts, gravity models and time series analysis will be included using local data sets. A four-hour field trip will be scheduled.
Prerequisite(s): One of Statistics 1770 or Geography 2700;
Third-year standing (a minimum of 60.0 credit hours)

Geography 3245

Urbanization in Developing Countries
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-0-0
A theoretical examination of the spatial and temporal patterns of urbanization in developing countries. Topics include urban structural characteristics, urban-rural relations, regional disparities, housing, employment, and relationships between urbanization and development processes.
Prerequisite(s): One of Geography 2000, Geography 2210, or Geography 2240;
Third-year standing (a minimum of 60.0 credit hours)
Equivalent: Geography 3850 (Third World Urbanization) (prior to 2003/2004)

Geography 3551/Management 3551

An Introduction to Tourism
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-0-0
This course provides an overview of tourism with an emphasis on socially and environmentally sustainable tourism. Topics covered include the nature and scope of tourism, public policy, tourism and economic development, tourism marketing, tourism impacts, aboriginal tourism, and ecotourism.
Prerequisite(s): Third-year standing (a minimum of 60.0 credit hours)

Geography 3700

Cartography
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-3-0
Theoretical principles and practical aspects of cartography. The course will cover the history of cartography; map projections; geographic data processing and generalization; cartographic design and symbolization; computer mapping.
Prerequisite(s): Geography 2700

Geography 3710

Field Techniques in the Earth Sciences
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-3-0
Other hours: 0-0-30
Mapping, recording and analysis of physical and cultural features in the southern Alberta landscape. Practical work to illustrate field research methodologies. Study projects will be carried out individually and in groups. Weekly field trips will be scheduled during the afternoon and may run as much as two hours beyond the lab period, especially where a considerable amount of travel time is required.
Prerequisite(s): Geography 2700;
One of Geography 2030 or Geology 2060

Geography 3720

Introduction to Remote Sensing
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-3-0
Principles of earth resources analysis using airborne and satellite imagery. Fundamentals of energy interactions with the earth and atmosphere, the electromagnetic spectrum, aerial photography and photogrammetry, remote sensing systems, digital image analysis and airborne mission planning. Applications in the physical and social sciences with examples of environmental and landuse change. Laboratory work will involve air photo interpretation and image analysis.
Prerequisite(s): Geography 2700

Geography 3730

Spatial Statistics
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-3-0
An introduction to statistical methods of spatial analysis, including techniques for description, sampling, comparison, relationships and trends.
Prerequisite(s): Geography 2700

Geography 3740

Geographic Information Systems
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-3-0
This course deals with the nature of geographic data, geographic modelling, data structures, Geographic Information Systems functions and implementation. Exercises in the course will make use of computer hardware and software designed for these tasks.
Prerequisite(s): Geography 2700

Geography 3750

GIS Applications in Human Geography
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-1-0
An applied introduction to GIS in Canadian human geography. Students will be exposed to the Canadian census of population, agricultural census, and other spatial data products. Manipulation of variables, interpretation of spatial patterns and trends and hypothesis testing using these data within GIS software.
Prerequisite(s): Geography 2700
Equivalent: Geography 3850 (GIS in Human Geography) (prior to 2003/2004)

Geography 3780

Field School
Credit hours: 3.0
Other hours: 0-0-63
A 10-day field school in an off-campus location. Review of the physical and human geography of the study area will be followed by information gathering and data analysis using geographical field techniques and equipment.
Prerequisite(s): Geography 1010 (Geography 1000 prior to 2004/2005);
Geography 2700
Recommended Background: Major in Geography, Environmental Science, Agricultural Studies, Urban and Regional Studies, Archaeology and Geography, or Computer Science and Geographical Information Science

Geography 3791

Field Excursion in Human Geography (Series)
Credit hours: 3.0
Other hours: 3-0-110
Extended field studies of specified regions. Studies will include field observation, discussion and interpretation of ancient and/or current societies and economic activities and the interactions of these with past and present environments. The focus of this course will be on human geography although some physical geography will be encountered. Inasmuch as this course involves travel to or residence at remote sites, costs borne by students vary but may range up to several thousand dollars.
Prerequisite(s): Geography 1010 (Geography 1000 prior to 2004/2005);
Third-year standing (a minimum of 60.0 credit hours)
Note: Students who have completed Geography 3790, Geography 3850 (Field Excursion), and/or Geography 4850 (Field Excursion) courses will only be allowed to register for Geography 3791 if the excursion is to a different geographical location.
Three (3) lecture hours prior to the excursion are required of all students to ensure they understand all appropriate logistical and safety information.

Geography 3792

Field Excursion in Physical Geography (Series)
Credit hours: 3.0
Other hours: 3-0-110
Extended field studies of specified regions. Studies will include field observation, discussion and interpretation of physical landscape evolution and processes past and present. The focus of this course will be on physical geography although some human geography will be encountered in the interactions of ancient and/or current societies with past and present environments. Inasmuch as this course involves travel to or residence at remote sites, costs borne by students vary but may range up to several thousand dollars.
Prerequisite(s): Geography 1010 (Geography 1000 prior to 2004/2005);
Third-year standing (a minimum of 60.0 credit hours)
Note: Students who have completed Geography 3790, Geography 3850 (Field Excursion), and/or Geography 4850 (Field Excursion) courses will only be allowed to register for Geography 3792 if the excursion is to a different geographical location.
Three (3) lecture hours prior to the excursion are required of all students to ensure they understand all appropriate logistical and safety information.

Geography 3850

Selected Topics in Geography
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-0-0

Geography 4012

Hydrology
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-3-0
The hydrological cycle. Interactions of the atmosphere, surface and subsurface water systems. Hydrological modelling using geographical information systems will be a major component of lectures and laboratory exercises.
Prerequisite(s): Geography 2015;
Geography 3740

Geography 4015

Integrated Watershed Management
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-3-0
Other hours: 0-0-16
Management of watersheds considering natural supply and demands; and natural and human-induced change. Modelling watershed processes using GIS and basic programming is a key objective of the course. Holistic management considers upstream and downstream interactions, and the interactive role of hydrology, hydraulics, ice processes, temperature, sediment, biota and land cover. Discussions address physical, chemical and biological components in natural and altered streams. A one-day or overnight field trip through a major watershed in Alberta is typically included.
Prerequisite(s): Geography 3740

Geography 4200

Project in Agricultural Geography
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-0-0
Other hours: 0-0-8
A project-based course in which students pursue a theoretically-informed research question of their own choosing. Class will collaborate on the construction of a survey instrument, which will be administered by the class at about the mid-point in the course. Results of data analysis will be presented in research seminars and a written report. One Saturday will be devoted to field work and data collection.
Prerequisite(s): Geography 3210

Geography 4220

Series in Advanced Economic Geography
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-0-0
Seminar presentation of contemporary problems in economic geography.
Prerequisite(s): Geography 3225/Management 3660

Geography 4240

Series in Advanced Urban Geography
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-0-0
Seminar presentation of contemporary problems in urban geography.
Prerequisite(s): Geography 3230

Geography 4500

Contemporary Issues and Problems in Planning Series
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-0-0
Advanced planning courses instructed by faculty or experienced planning professionals.
Prerequisite(s): Geography 2535;
Additional prerequisites may be specified (including any recommended background) for individual offerings

Geography 4700

Advanced Computer Mapping
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-3-0
Advanced topics and concepts in analytical and computer cartography. Development, analysis and integration of multisource geographical data and databases. Algorithms for computer mapping and visualization of geographical phenomena. Laboratory work will develop applications using computer mapping software and spatial data.
Prerequisite(s): Geography 3700

Geography 4710

Remote Sensing Field School
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 40-9-0
Other hours: 0-0-10
Field measurement for airborne and satellite image analysis. The spatial, spectral, radiometric, biophysical, ecological and morphometric properties of the Earth's surface will be measured, analysed, mapped, and modelled. Field instrumentation, use, interpretation, analysis and validation as well as instruction in spectroradiometry, global positioning systems, ecological data collection, computer image analysis, and GIS will be provided. Includes field work and computer laboratory exercises.
Prerequisite(s): Third-year standing (a minimum of 60.0 credit hours);
A major in Geography, Biological Sciences, Environmental Science, or Computer Science
OR
Successful written application to the Department of Geography
Recommended Background: A course in data analysis
Note: Offered off-campus. Lodging fee may apply.

Geography 4725

Advanced Remote Sensing
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-3-0
Digital image analysis of aerial and satellite data for earth observation and studies of environmental and landuse change from local to global scales. Computer graphics and image processing in spatial, spectral and time dimensions. Data integration, classification, predictive models and fundamentals of spectroradiometry. Laboratory work will focus on digital image analysis software and applications.
Prerequisite(s): Geography 3720

Geography 4740

Applied Geographic Information Systems
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-3-0
This course is a continuation of Geographic Information Systems. The course deals with advanced topics such as modelling languages, visualization, data integration, decision-making, system implementation and new directions. A great deal of emphasis is placed on problem solving and projects.
Prerequisite(s): Geography 3740

Geography 4750

Glacial Processes, Measurements, and Models
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-3-0
Other hours: 0-0-8
Physical theories, measurement techniques, and models that are currently used to describe glacial processes and analyse glaciers and ice sheets. Topics include glacier monitoring; ice dynamics; conceptual, analytical and numerical models of glacial processes; and remote sensing and GIS analysis of ice masses. One eight-hour field excursion will be scheduled on a Saturday.
Prerequisite(s): Geography 2030;
Geography 3720
Recommended Background: One of Geography 3060 or Geology 4010
Equivalent: Geography 4850 (Glacial Processes, Measurements and Models) (prior to 2005/2006)

Geography 4751

Seminar in Spatial Modelling
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-0-0
The use of models for improved understanding of spatial patterns and variability. Analysis, prediction and diffusion through geographic space and time. Selected applications and case studies will be drawn from the physical and social sciences.
Prerequisite(s): One of Geography 3700, Geography 3720, Geography 3730, or Geography 3740

Geography 4752

Seminar in Geographical Information Systems
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-0-0
Trends in Geographical Information Systems for spatial analysis using information technology. Theoretical and computer-based approaches to spatial pattern analysis and database management systems. Applications and future directions will be emphasized.
Prerequisite(s): Geography 3740

Geography 4753

Seminar in Remote Sensing
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-0-0
Contemporary issues in remote sensing and image analysis. Advanced approaches to classification, modelling, change detection and scaling. The role of remote sensing science in integrated studies of global change. Research and new directions.
Prerequisite(s): Geography 4725

Geography 4760

Agricultural Soil Management
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-0-1
Other hours: 0-0-16
Management and conservation of agricultural soils including effects of different crop management systems on soil properties. Topics include: soil fertility; soil and plant testing; commercial fertilizer; manure management; soil quality in both irrigated and dryland crop production systems; identification and management of problem soils; environmental concerns. Practical field experience is included. Two eight-hour field trips will be scheduled on Saturdays near the beginning of the fall semester for field study of different soil types.
Prerequisite(s): Geography 3080

Geography 4770

Irrigation Science
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-0-1
Irrigation as a contemporary agricultural practice. Studies of global, regional and local irrigation developments, soil-water-plant relationships for consumptive use of water, on-farm irrigation techniques and applications. Design of water conveyance systems, pipe and channel hydraulics. Water supplies for irrigation. Environmental concerns and opportunities.
Prerequisite(s): One of Geography 3080 or a course in Soil Science from a recognized college

Geography 4850

Selected Topics in Geography
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-0-0

Geography 4900

History and Theory of Geography
Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-0-0
History and theory of geography from the Greeks to the present. Current status of geography in major nations of the world.
Prerequisite(s): Three courses (9.0 credit hours) in Geography

Geography 4995

Undergraduate Thesis
Credit hours: 6.0
Contact hours per week: Variable
This is a research-oriented course in which students will conduct empirical research, submit a report in the form of an undergraduate thesis which will be made publicly available, and report orally on the work. In consultation with their Thesis Supervisor, students will define a research problem and formulate a research plan.
Prerequisite(s): Fourth-year standing (a minimum of 90.0 credit hours);
A cumulative GPA of 3.30 or higher;
An Independent Study (3990) in Geography or Geology
Note: Contact hours will vary. Students should be aware that this course involves regular contact with the Thesis Supervisor as well as considerable independent work.
See Part 7 - Arts and Science, Sections 5.c. (p. 96), 6.c. (p. 98), and 7.c. (p. 99).