LOGIC

LOGIC

Note: Logic courses are offered by the Department of Philosophy.

LOGIC 1000
Introduction to Logic

Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-0-0

Logic is the general examination of arguments and the distinction between good arguments and merely good-looking arguments. Techniques, both formal and informal, are presented for evaluation of reasoning in all walks of life - in ordinary conversation, in political debates and in science. The study of logic fosters the ability to think critically and carefully in all fields of endeavour.

LOGIC 2001
Inductive Logic

Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-0-0

An introduction to hypothesis testing in both the physical and social sciences. For example, do we use statistical evidence to test whether smoking causes cancer or poverty causes crime? Philosophical problems about induction (for instance, can we know the future will resemble the past?) will also be discussed.

Recommended background: Logic 1000.

LOGIC 2002
Deductive Logic

Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-0-0

Formal logic uses symbols to state clear conditions for good reasoning. Topics include proof theory, model theory and an introduction to more advanced topics such as the expressive limits of first-order logic, soundness, completeness and (for those interested in computer-science applications) the satisfaction problem.

Prerequisite: Logic 1000.

LOGIC 2500
Studies in Logic (Series)

Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-0-0

The 2500 series makes available to students special courses that are not offered regularly. Some of these courses reflect the research interests of members of the faculty, and thus offer students an early glimpse of how research is done. In other cases, the course could be a response to student interest.

Prerequisites and recommended backgrounds will be specified for individual offerings.

LOGIC 3001
Deviant Logic

Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-0-0

Deviant logics are those that deviate from and/or even contradict cases of standard first-order deductive logic. Such theories include modal logic, relevant logic, quantum logic and paraconsistent logic. Procedures are developed for evaluating differences and adjudicating theoretical rivalries.

Prerequisite: Logic 2002.

LOGIC 3002
History of Logic

Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-0-0

Logic is one of the oldest sciences. We examine high points of its development, such as Aristotle's theory of the syllogism, stoic logic, medieval logic, the Port Royal logic, the logic of Kant and Hegel, Mill's logic, Boole's logic and the logic of Frege and Russell.

Prerequisite: Logic 1000.

Recommended background: One other course (3.0 credit hours) in Logic.

LOGIC 3500
Intermediate Studies in Logic (Series)

Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-0-0

The 3500 series has the same function as the 2500 series but at levels of study appropriate to more senior students.

Prerequisites and recommended backgrounds will be specified for individual offerings.

LOGIC 4001
Mathematical Logic

Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-0-0

The most important result in modern logic is Gödel's proof that systems of arithmetic formalized with the aid of the Peano axioms are incomplete. Consequently (with important implications for computability) there are true propositions of such systems which cannot be proved. This course prepares the technically-minded student to prove Gödel's Theorem.

Prerequisite: Logic 2002 or Mathematics 2000 or 3100.

LOGIC 4500
Advanced Studies in Logic (Series)

Credit hours: 3.0
Contact hours per week: 3-0-0

The 4500 series has the same function as the 2500 and 3500 series but at levels of study appropriate to senior philosophy or mathematics students with a strong background in logic.

Prerequisites and recommended backgrounds will be specified for individual offerings.

LOGIC 4995
Undergraduate Thesis

Credit hours: 6.0
Contact hours per week: 1-0-0
Other hours: 0-0-10

This is a challenging, work-intensive, research-oriented course. This research will be presented in a report in the form of an undergraduate thesis which will be made publicly available and which will be the subject of an oral defence.

Prerequisites: Fourth-year standing (a minimum of 90.0 credit hours).

A cumulative GPA of 3.30 or higher in the last 30 courses.

A cumulative GPA of 3.50 or higher on all Logic and Philosophy courses.

Completion of at least one Independent Study in Logic or Philosophy at either the 3000 or 4000 level.

Note: See Part 7 - Arts and Science, Sections 4.c., 5.c. and 6.c., pp. 84-87.