I-CYS Symposium - At The Intersections of Childhood 2017

The Institute for Child & Youth Studies (I-CYS) is hosting its inaugural At the Intersections of Childhood Symposium on the intersections of Digital, Indigenous, and Youth Issues on Saturday, April 1, 2017 in Markin Hall. This full-day symposium brings together voices from across campus and beyond for a day of discussion regarding the intersection of these three issues.  

The event will consist of a keynote lecture by Kirsten Lindquist (U of A, Native Studies), followed by a lunch, and three panel discussions by University of Lethbridge scholars and invited guests (Dr. Peter Dawson, U of C, Dr. Chelsey Hauge, Brock University, and Daniela Navia, MA). During the panels, the audience will have the opportunity to respond to the papers and reflect on the intersections of these issues. Moreover, attendees will learn from other scholars, hear from community members, activists and practitioners, and ultimately to transform the way research is conceptualized in these areas.  

Following the panel discussions, this symposium will conclude with a student poster session against the backdrop of a collegial wine and cheese gathering.

Use the hashtag #icys2017 to get involved in the conversation and make sure you follow I-CYS on Twitter for up to date information! 

More Information Below:

Registration

****REGISTRATION IS NOW CLOSED***

Register for the full day (includes lunch and interactive discussion panels):   

$40 Faculty   -   $15 U of L Students   -   free admission for community members (including lunch) 

We ask everyone to REGISTER/RSVP, but only university-affiliated faculty, staff, and students will PAY a registration fee. 

Please Register, RSVP, and Pay Here! 

The keynote is public and attendance of the keynote is FREE to everyone!

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Keynote by Kirsten Lindquist: Media Arts Justice - Indigenous Youth Self-Determination

Kirsten Lindquist is of Cree-Métis and European ancestry from rural north-east Alberta. She is currently the administrator of the Aboriginal Governance Program at the University of Alberta's Faculty of Native Studies. She introduced and taught a new special topics course to the Faculty, Indigenous New Media, which integrates both classroom and lab learning experiences. Based on her MA in Indigenous Governance community project, Kirsten integrates media arts activities into Indigenous youth governance and leadership, and recently worked with Métis youth in imagining a Métis youth governance framework at their annual conference. She also volunteers at iHuman Youth Society in Edmonton supporting and co-creating amazing art, fashion, and textile projects with awesome young people.

April 1, 9:30-10:30 am, Marking Hall Atrium. 

EVERYONE WELCOME! Moderator: Amy Mack

 

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Symposium Schedule - Saturday, April 1, 2017

 

8:30-9:00 Breakfast (for registered attendees)

9:00-9:30 Introduction & Opening

  • Prayer: Ira Provost

  • I-CYS Intro Dr. Newberry

 

9:30-10:30 Kirsten Lindquist Keynote: Media Arts Justice - Indigenous Youth Self-Determination

EVERYONE WELCOME!

Moderator: Amy Mack

 

15 min break

 

10:45-12:15 First Panel Discussion (Digital)

Facilitators: Victoria Holec

Panelists: Dr. Chelsey Hauge, Dr. Peter Dawson, Raising Spirit

12:15-13:15 Lunch (for registered attendees)

13:15-14:45 Second Panel Discussion (Indigenous)

Facilitators: Amy Mack 

Panelists: Kirsten Lindquist, Roderick McCleod, Dr. Michelle Hogue

 

15 min break

 

15:00-16:30 Third Panel Discussion (Youth)

Facilitators: Kaitlynn Weaver

Panelists: Daniela Navia, Dr. Erin Spring, Dr. Jeffrey MacCormack

 

16:30-17:30 Student Poster Sessions and Wine & Cheese (for registered attendees)

17:30 Closing Remarks and Prize Presentation

 

Meet our Panelists

Peter Dawson

Dr. Dawson’s expertise lies in digital archaeology; specifically, the use of reality capture technologies like terrestrial laser scanning for preserving, monitoring, interpreting, and disseminating heritage and cultural knowledge in northern and western Canada. Working with colleague Dr. Richard Levy, Dawson helped pioneer the use of digital technologies in arctic archaeology and polar history research through the creation of virtual exhibits, virtual tours, and atlases. Many of these projects have been done in partnership with such organisations as Parks Canada, Virtual Museum of Canada, and the Department of Education, GN. Dawson has worked in the community of Arviat for over a decade with Luke Suluk, former president of Inuit Heritage Trust, and a well-known cultural knowledge holder in Nunavut. Other notable collaborators have included the late Mark Kalluak, recipient of the Order of Canada for his work as an author and educator. Dawson has supervised close to a dozen graduate students, many of whom have gone on to distinguish themselves in areas such as Indigenous archaeology. Dr. Natasha Lyons, for example, is a leading figure in Indigenous northern archaeology and member of iPinCH (Intellectual Property Issues in Cultural Heritage), a large international research project based out of Simon Fraser University. Dawson is currently working with the Alberta Government and Parks Canada to develop digital monitoring programs for heritage at risk. He is also developing reality capture workshops for Indigenous youth in Alberta (Blackfoot) and Nunavut (Arviarmiut). These workshops will provide opportunities to learn about laser scanning, photospheres, and drone-based photogrammetry, and how they can be used to preserve heritage. 

Chelsey Hauge

Chelsey is an educational scholar. Her research centers on the intersection of literacies, media networks, and girlhood, especially insofar as media engagement can shape social justice learning. Recent projects have focused on how girl activists rely on social media in order to build widespread girl movements and on the media literacy initiatives of development agencies that aim to equip young people with the civic skills necessary to do community development work.  
Currently Chelsey is an educational researcher at the Clayman Institute for Gender Research and the Center for the Advancement of Women’s Leadership. She works primarily on the Seeds of Change Initiative, which aims to intervene in debates around how to support girls’ leadership capacities, particularly as they relate to gendered experiences of STEM and technology learning. Chelsey holds a PhD in Language and Literacy Education from the University of British Columbia, an MA in Media Studies from The New School, and a BA in Gender Feminist Studies and Spanish from Pitzer College.

Michelle Hogue

Michelle currently is an associate professor and Coordinator of the First Nations’ Transition Program at the University of Lethbridge. Her teaching and research center on building bridges between Aboriginal and Western ways of knowing and learning (AWKL) to enable the success of Aboriginal learners in science and mathematics through a Two-Eyed Seeing approach (to see with an Indigenous lens and a Western lens, and to use both together for informed and bridging understanding). Michelle’s methodological approach is hands-on learning by doing through science, technology engineering, arts and mathematics (STEAM). Early engagement is key to gaining interest in the foundations of science and mathematics, so she works with students both on-reserve as well as those transitioning into and through university. Her funded and well-recognized teaching and research blends required curricular and institutional demands with narrative and arts practices in ways that attend to AWKL. Michelle is currently gathering information on best practices in Canada, the United States, New Zealand, and Australia for engaging Aboriginal students in science and mathematics to develop an inclusive, culturally responsive teaching practice and curricula for educators that enables Aboriginal learners to successfully bridge cultures and enter into science and mathematics-related academic and career paths.

Kirsten Lindquist

Kirsten Lindquist is of Cree-Métis and European ancestry from rural north-east Alberta. She is currently the administrator of the Aboriginal Governance Program at the University of Alberta's Faculty of Native Studies. She introduced and taught a new special topics course to the Faculty, Indigenous New Media, which integrates both classroom and lab learning experiences. Based on her MA in Indigenous Governance community project, Kirsten integrates media arts activities into Indigenous youth governance and leadership, and recently worked with Métis youth in imagining a Métis youth governance framework at their annual conference. She also volunteers at iHuman Youth Society in Edmonton supporting and co-creating amazing art, fashion, and textile projects with awesome young people.

Jeffrey MacCormack

Jeffrey is new to the University of Lethbriudge and recently finished his Ph.D. in Education at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario. Besides his current teaching at the University of Lethbridge, he has 10 prior years of experience teaching elementary students, and four prior years teaching undergraduate students and practicing teachers. He has conducted research on social play, autism spectrum disorder, emotional well-being, and youth development. Currently, he is collaborating with Dr. Robbin Gibb in the Department of Neuroscience to look at a play-based intervention (Lego building blocks) for children and youth with difficulty socializing and regulating emotions. Jeffrey is a new core member of the Institute for Child & Youth Studies (I-CYS) since January 2017. He has a passion for learning, teaching, growing, and is eager to develop in his new role as Assistant Professor of Educational Psychology and Inclusion at the Faculty of Education.

Daniela Navia

 

Daniela Navia is a Latina feminist from Bogota, Colombia. Her SSHRC-funded Master’s research focused on using arts and storytelling to create a better understanding of how colonialism impacts Indigenous youth in the child welfare system. She is currently working for the Government of Alberta as the research consultant for the Arts sector.

Jan Newberry

Jan Newberry is a cultural anthropologist who has worked in Java, Indonesia, since 1992. Her 2006 book Back Door Java: State Formation and the Domestic in Working Class Java considered the role of neighbourhood women in managing their communities. Her more recent research concerns early childhood education, care and development programs that have emerged in Indonesia in response to World Bank and other intergovernmental initiatives. Jan has been a fellow at the Asia Research Institute of the National University of Singapore and at KITLV/Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean StudiesShe is a co-founder of the Institute for Child and Youth Studies (I-CYS) and Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Lethbridge, and she is currently involved in a collaborative, transmedia project on ethnographic methods with local Blackfoot peoples.

Roderick McLeod

Roderick is a Métis Elder. 

 

Erin Spring

Erin is currently an Instructor in Academic Writing and Liberal Education at the University of Lethbridge. She was the first I-CYS Postdoctoral Fellow from 2014 to August 2016, and will be returning for a final year as the I-CYS postdoc as well as brand new I-CYS core member in January 2017. She received her PhD in Education from the University of Cambridge in 2014. Erin’s interdisciplinary work straddles the fields of children’s literature, child and youth studies, and children's geographies. She was the 2015 recipient of IBBY Canada’s Frances E Russell grant for her current work with Blackfoot readers in southern Alberta. Her most recent publications can be found in Children’s Geographies, Jeunesse: Young People, Texts, Cultures, and Children’s Literature in Education.

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Student Posters:

The following posters have been accepted for presentation at the I-CYS Symposium from 16:30-17:30 at the Student Poster Session

Undergraduate Posters:

  • Stephanie Croft: Technology Standpoint in Elementary Schools [unable to present]
  • Amy Henrickson: Prevalence of Diabetes in Indigenous populations
  • Angie Nikoleychuk: Autism, iPads and Interaction: Designing Technology for Independence and Intimitable Minds ***Ungergraduate Best Poster Award Winner***

Graduate Posters:

  • Jillian Barnes, Erin Mason, & Melissa Shouting: Taking Action on the Truth & Reconciliation Commission Calls to Action through a Culturally-Informed Program for Adolescents and Families
  • Doug Checkley: From MinecraftTM to "Ourcraft": Developing Youth Social Networks in Virtual Spaces
  • Ashley Henrickson: Uncovering the Lost Voices of Canadian Children in the Great War ***Graduate Best Poster Award Winner***
  • Erin Mason: The Influence of the School Environment on Alcohol Use among Indigenous Adolescents
  • Elaine Toth: Childhood Agency: The Post-Second World War Dutch Child Immigrant to Alberta [unable to present]
  • Kaitlynn Weaver: Exploring Indigenous Youth Unemployment in a Canadian Context: Human Capital Theory vs. Labour Market Segmentation Theory

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Symposium Co-organizers: 

Amy Mack, MA, Cultural Anthropologist, Researcher for I-CYS, ac.mack@uleth.ca

Victoria Holec, MSc, PhD Student for I-CYS, victoria.holec@uleth.ca

Organizing Committee Members: 

Kaitlynn Weaver, MA student

Ashley Henrickson, MA student

Dr. Erin Spring, postdoctoral fellow

Jenny Oseen, staff

I-CYS Directorate:

Acting Co-Director: Dr. Jan Newberry 

Director: Dr. Kristine Alexander

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Thank you to our Donors and Sponsors:

   The I-CYS Symposium is the proud recipient of the 2017 SHCY Outreach Grant! 

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