Global Citizenship Cohort | Courses (2019/2020)


Theme 1: Identity & Politics


Tentative schedule of first-year courses (the usual course load is 5 courses per semester).

IMPORTANT: The Identity & Politics theme has you taking LBED 1000/2000 together, which gives you credit for one social science, one humanities/fine arts, and one natural science course. This is a great advantage of the Identity & Politics theme!

Fall 2019
  1. Introduction to Language & Literature – ENGL 1900E: Chris Grignard
    why? An introduction to the study of English language and literature, involving an exploration of various genres of literature and non-literary texts and requiring a series of critical assignments designed to encourage analytical reading, thinking and writing.
     
  2. Knowledge and Liberal Education – LBED 1000B: Brendan Cummins
    why? Liberal Education 1000 will help you develop skills such as critical thinking, numeracy, oral and written communications, and research. It’s more than just skills, though; this course will integrate ideas from all areas and help you see the connections and questions that influence these ideas.
     
  3. The Global Citizenship cohort Seminar - LBED 1150B: Lisa Lambert
    why? This half-course, for Cohort students only, will meet once a week to plan Cohort activities, discuss connections across Cohort courses, and hear guest speakers of interest to our theme.
     
  4. A course that you select
     
  5. A course that you select
Spring 2020
  1. Introduction to Political Science - POLI 1000A: Lisa Lambert
    why? This course will give you insights into the how’s and why’s of politics, using current events to illustrate concepts around our governmental institutions and systems.
     
  2. Identity and Liberal Education – LBED2000: Bruce Mackay
    why? This course allows you to explore the concept of individual and group identities in a multidisciplinary setting.
     
  3. The Global Citizenship cohort Seminar - LBED 2150B: Lisa Lambert
    why? This half-course, for Cohort students only, will meet once a week to plan Cohort activities, discuss connections across Cohort courses, and hear guest speakers of interest to our theme.  You will also work on your cohort project in your second semester, giving you the chance to put your learning and connections to work.
     
  4. A course that you select
     
  5. A course that you select

Theme 2: Challenging Worldviews


Tentative schedule of first-year courses (the usual course load is 5 courses per semester).

Fall 2019
  1. Introduction to Asia - ASIA 1000A: John Harding
    why? This course will examine history, culture and society of South, Southeast, and East Asia. A mix of diverse worldviews alongside shared themes offer challenging concepts from multiple perspectives across time, space, and different academic disciplines from the social sciences and humanities.
     
  2. Knowledge and Liberal Education – LBED 1000B: Brendan Cummins
    why? Liberal Education 1000 will help you develop skills such as critical thinking, numeracy, oral and written communications, and research. It’s more than just skills, though; this course will integrate ideas from all areas and help you see the connections and questions that influence these ideas.
     
  3. The Global Citizenship cohort Seminar - LBED 1150A: John Harding
    why? This half-course, for Cohort students only, will meet once a week to plan Cohort activities, discuss connections across Cohort courses, and hear guest speakers of interest to our theme.
     
  4. A course that you select
     
  5. A course that you select
Spring 2020
  1. Studying Religion as an Academic Discipline – RELS 2001A (Course name change pending to Religion, Worldviews and Identity): James Linville
    why? This course explores different ways to understand religion as both a product and producer of worldviews and their expression in culture and identity. It encourages critical thinking about boundaries between religion and other spheres of life while also addressing whether "religion" is reducible to social, psychological, or other factors. The course will introduce key thinkers in the study of religion and culture and provide opportunities for cross-cultural comparative analyses.

  2. Introduction to Archaeology - ARKY 1000: Shawn Bubel
    why? Archaeology is the study of the past through the analysis of material remains. The artifacts people used, the food they ate, and the structures they built reflect their identity. Their worldviews were a product of their interaction with the cultural and natural environments, just as ours are today. Archaeologists study the material remains left behind in order to understand this interaction. Archaeology offers a means to appreciate the different worldviews that existed through time and across the globe.
     
  3. The Global Citizenship cohort Seminar - LBED 2150A: John Harding
    why? This half-course, for Cohort students only, will meet once a week to plan Cohort activities, discuss connections across Cohort courses, and hear guest speakers of interest to our theme.  You will also work on your cohort project in your second semester, giving you the chance to put your learning and connections to work.
     
  4. A course that you select
     
  5. A course that you select