Understanding the Complexities of Imaging the Earth: The Challenge of Image Calibration.

Thursday, November 19, 2015 - 7:00pm - 9:00pm

Event Location: City Hall (910 4th Avenue S, Lethbridge)

FREE. Everyone welcome. No RSVP required. Seating is limited, however, so arrive early! Appetizers and a cash bar will be available.

Join Dr. Craig Coburn as he explores

Understanding the Complexities of Imaging the Earth: The Challenge of Image Calibration.

The goal of any Earth observation system is to provide calibrated, consistent measurements of Earth’s surface features. Sensor radiometric calibration is the most important component of quantitative applications in remote sensing. Sensors are calibrated prior to launch and checked post launch but indirect approaches that use Earth surface targets have become increasingly important as reference targets to characterize changes in sensors over time as well as to provide a consistent source for the intercomparison and cross-calibration of sensors.

While a seemingly simple task, these measurements are essential for all Earth observations systems that seek to quantify Earth surface characteristics. The end result is the conversion of images into data that are used daily to monitor and map our world.

Dr. Craig Coburn will discuss his involvement in a multi-University and NASA-lead team seeking to develop an absolute radiometric calibration site in North America.

REMINDER: We outgrew our space from last year, so this year the series will be held at City Hall from 7:00 - 9:00pm. Seating is limited, so be sure to get there early - no RSVP required!

Sponsored by:

After the Talk

On Thursday night, Coburn presented, Understanding the Complexities of Imaging the Earth: The Challenge of Image Callibration, to an engaged crowd at Lethbridge City Hall. Coburn spoke about the challenges of remote sensing calibration in the third installment of the PUBlic Professor series where he removed some of the mystery around the science of remote sensing and spoke to the incredible detail required to produce quality imaging and data. Read the full story here.