Faculty Research Interests

Scott Allen (PhD McMaster) Memory, categorization of things remembered, medical expertise in diagnosis and directed forgetting.

Barrett, Louise (PhD University College London) The evolution and development of social cognition in human and non-human primates. Embodied and distributed cognition. Ecology and evolution of primate sociality, including sexual conflict, parental investment and maternal effects.

Henzi, Peter
(PhD Natal) The evolution and development of social cognition in human and non-human primates. Embodied and distributed cognition. Ecology and evolution of primate sociality, including sexual conflict, parental investment and maternal effects.

Jean-Baptiste Leca (University Louis Pasteur) Intergroup behavioural variation in nonhuman primates, behavioural innovation and traditions, social learning, cultural behaviours, adaptive and non-adaptive behaviours. Developmental, mechanistic, functional, and phylogenetic approaches to primate behaviour.
Fangfang Li (PhD Ohio State University) Child speech development, acoustic phonetics, cross-language comparison of fricatives.

David Logue (PhD Colorado State University) Animal communication, bioacoustics, individual differences.

Jennifer Mather (PhD Brandeis) Behaviour of octopuses, eye movement in schizophrenics, Alzheimers disease.

Sadr, Javid (PhD Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Object and person perspective, neural mechanisms of high-level vision, face and biological-motion processing, motor control and learning.

Paul Vasey (PhD Université de Montréal) Animal Behavior and Cognition, Primate Neuroanatomy, Human Evolution, Evolutionary Psychology, Sexuality and Gender.

John Vokey
(PhD McMaster) Implicit memory, concept formation, computer algorithms and numerical analysis.

Robert Williams (PhD McMaster) Associate Member. Gambling [social and economic impacts of gambling, risk taking and its utility, internet gambling, the cross-cultural meaning of gambling, behavioural/psychological patterns of stock market players, and all aspects of problem gambling (assessment, etiology, prevention, and treatment)]; assessment, etiology and treatment of addiction and mental health problems.

We hope that you will consider joining the Department of Psychology. We are confident that our students receive instruction and training of the highest quality, and we are committed to providing first-rate courses, individual attention to students, and hands-on research training. If you are interested in learning more about the Psychology Program at the University of Lethbridge, please contact Leanne to arrange a visit to the department, or feel free to contact any individual professor with whom you may wish to speak