University of Lethbridge highlights for the week of Jan. 16 to 21

Mon, 01/16/2017

The University of Lethbridge has several events lined up this week that may be of interest to your readers, viewers and listeners. Members of the media who are interested in covering these events are encouraged to contact the individual event organizer directly.

                        

What is Normal Eating? Why Diets Don’t Work — Lunch and Learn

Thursday, Jan. 19, noon to 1 p.m., AH100, Andy’s Place

Dietitian Faye Craig will look at the flashy promises that diets offer and explain why they don’t work in the long term.

Contact: Faye Craig, 403-329-2429, faye.craig@uleth.ca

 

50(art + people = x) and Mi’kwite’tmn — Opening receptions

Thursday, Jan. 19, 4 to 6 p.m., Main Gallery, W600, Centre for the Arts

Ursula Johnson, an interdisciplinary artist from Nova Scotia who has Mi’kmaw ancestry, explores contemporary assumptions about museum practices and traditional First Nations art making. The exhibition has three parts, including a ‘Museological Grand Hall.’ This display features sandblasted images of Mi’kmaq baskets on plexi display units. The second part features an ‘Archive Room’ where visitors can be the curator and sort baskets into their categories. The third part is an opening performance. Johnson will also work with a group of local Indigenous high school students on an art education project.

The 50 exhibition is a curated selection from submissions by local artists and art students to help launch the U of L’s 50th anniversary. The artists explored the number 50 in any way they chose.

Contact: Art Gallery, artgallery@uleth.ca

 

Formidable Goddess: Tracing the Rise of Durga, the Buffalo-Demon Crusher — Department of History Colloquium Series

Friday, Jan. 20, 3 to 4:30 p.m., B660 University Hall

Prof. Hillary Rodrigues, Religious Studies, will talk about the growing exuberance in the worship rites of the Great Goddess, Durga. During Navaratra, a nine-night festival in her honour, Durga is worshipped in temples, with blood sacrifice, in elaborate temporary shrines and in several earthen and vegetative forms. The ascendancy of the Great Goddess may be linked to her associations with sovereign and personal empowerment as well as spiritual beneficence.

Contact: Bev Garnett, 403-380-1894 or bev.garnett@uleth.ca

 

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Contact:

Caroline Zentner, public affairs advisor

403-394-3975 or 403-795-5403 (cell)

caroline.zentner@uleth.ca