Literacy Research

Faculty of Education • The University of Lethbridge
4401 University Drive • Lethbridge, AB, Canada • T1K 3M4

Overview

The Literacy Research Centre is dedicated to the interdisciplinary study of literacy and its implications for education in particular and Canadian society more broadly. Established in June 2001, the principal aim of the Literacy Research Centre is to investigate: What are the new and important literacies and what are the implications of these for teacher education and society?

The Centre houses five principal researchers, each of whom works in collaboration with classroom teachers, student teachers, graduate students, school counselors, teacher consultants, school administrators, as well as scholars from other institutions. To date, the research projects have addressed a variety of areas, issues and topics including: teacher as writer; the significance of literacy in indigenous pedagogy; new literacies in the high school English context; writing groups as significant literacy events for teachers; reflection and renewal, global/international literacy contexts in teaching; and the instructional implication of the demands of the technological literacy in school. Each project aims at identifying and articulating the new literacies called for in Canadian society in the new millennium, and the implications for public and university education.

Researchers working in the Literacy Research Centre have
(a) conducted site-based literacy research
(b) disseminated research at conferences and in publications
(c) acquired materials and resources (books, research articles, audiovisual)
(d) established an extensive data base of research and
(e) made such resources available to researchers and practitioners.

With the initial funding from the University of Lethbridge, (Government of Alberta Research Excellence Envelope and Internal SSHRC grant), the Centre continues to develop a network of scholars, practitioners, students, and community participants studying and practicing literacy and pedagogy in Canadian society as well as internationally.