Book Reviews

The Sisters Brothers, by Patrick deWitt House of Anansi Press, 2011 Reviewed by Kari Tanaka You’ve all heard that you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover but, in this case, I urge you to channel your inner rebel, throw caution to the wind, and judge away, because the cover of this book is bloody fantastic! The graphic work of artist Dan Stiles immediately instils a sense of the whimsically violent storyline within while designer, Suet Yee...
The Help by Kathryn Stockett Plenty has already been said about The Help, a sprawling novel told by three women living in Civil Rights-era Mississippi. The paperback cover blares with quotes such as, "This could be one of the most important pieces of fiction since To Kill a Mockingbird" (NPR) (which it is not) and "The must-read choice of every book club in the country" (Huffington Post) (which it probably is). What the quotes do not say is...
Zeus and the Giant Iced Tea: Poems by Leopold McGinnis, is just one of many fine titles published by AU Press as part of their Mingling Voices series; a series that “aims to promote authors who challenge traditions and cultural stereotypes” and is “designed to reach a wide variety of readers, both generalists and specialists.” That said, being a University student you have an obligation, or at least an excuse, to challenge traditions and...
Reviewed by Kari Tanaka Hannah Pittard’s foray into novel-length fiction is nothing short of amazing! The Fate’s Will Find Their Way is a beautifully written coming of age story, revolving around the mysterious disappearance of sixteen-year-old Nora Lindell from her “safe” suburban neighbourhood. This event becomes the pivotal reference point around which a group of teenage boys begin to frame their lives and, ultimately, the adult memories...
Reviewed by Kari Tanaka Graphica is gaining a firm foothold in the literary world and is becoming a very popular form for authors and/or artists to pen their memoirs. Whether you are new to the form or have devoured a multitude of graphic titles, David Small’s Stitches is one of those rare gems that you will savour page by page and then proceed to recommend to anyone who will listen! David Small is perhaps best known for his work as a children...
Reviewed by Kari Tanaka I have always been impressed by writers who are skilled enough to write extremely deep and complex stories in deceptively simple ways and Canadian author, Douglas Coupland, does just that in the latest CBC Massey Lectures/novel, Player One. Set in an airport cocktail lounge in Toronto the novel is written from the perspectives of five main characters, four of whom are human and the fifth of whom is, (and I apologize in...
Reviewed by Rebecca Colbeck Christopher Moore’s book features a very clear warning. “This is a bawdy tale. Herein you will find gratuitous shagging, murder, spanking, maiming, treason, and heretofore unexplored heights of vulgarity and profanity, as well as non-traditional grammar, split infinitives, and the odd wank.” If that sounds like something you would enjoy, you have stumbled upon the perfect book. I have tried repeatedly to summarize...
Reviewed by Rebecca Colbeck We have all experienced it: that sinking feeling in the bottom of your gut. The exam that you have studied for weeks for is now laid out before you. You turn it over and...draw a total blank. Its vast white spaces seem much like your mind: empty and devoid of any relevant information. Perhaps you have wasted hours studying the wrong material for the exam or worse, you forgot there was an exam at all. What to do…...
Reveiwed by Rebecca Colbeck “You can tell al lot about somebody in a minute, if you choose the right minute. Here are 228 of them”. And so starts Neil Strauss’ Everyone Loves You When You’re Dead. For those of you unfamiliar with Strauss, he is a veteran pop-culture journalist for such publications as Rolling Stone, the New York Times, Source magazine and countless other publications. He has also written or co-written several bestselling...
Reviewed by Rebecca Colbeck Murder mysteries are not generally my preferred choice of reading material, nor are period pieces, but there is something about James W. Nichol’s writing style that I find absolutely enthralling. Death Spiral is the third novel by James W. Nichol that I have read and I thoroughly enjoyed it. His character driven dialogues and fascinating plot twists draw you in from the first page, and you soon find yourself unable...

Events Calendar

Monday, November 13, 2017 (All day)
The Bookstore will be closed Monday November 13th to observe the Remembrance Day stat.