Meet Our Faculty & Staff

**Under Construction**

Faculty Members

Linda Many Guns
Chair, Assistant Professor
Indigenous Studies
Office: A 448
Phone: (403) 394-3956
Email: linda.manyguns@uleth.ca
Research Interests:

Indigenous methodologies, Aboriginal knowledge application, Aboriginal paradigms, Aboriginal community knowledge holders, traditional knowledge, IK, customary laws, Aboriginal policies, Aboriginal culture and protocol, cultural drift, Indigenous stories, storytelling, oral histories, oral practices, collective knowledge, traditional gender roles, symbolic storytelling, holistic knowledge, art based research methodologies.

Learn More: http://directory.uleth.ca/users/linda.manyguns

 
Hendrika Beaulieu

Learn More http://directory.uleth.ca/users/beaulieu

Assistant Professor 
Indigenous Studies
Office: A 412 
Phone: (403) 329-2488
Email: beaulieu@uleth.ca
Research Interests:
 
 
Monique Giroux
Assistant Professor, Indigenous Research Chair
Indigenous Studies
Office: A 444
Phone: (403) 394-3969
Email: monique.giroux@uleth.ca
Research Interests:

Monique Giroux is an ethnomusicologist whose research centres on Métis cultural and political revival and resurgence in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta. Emerging from an understanding that cultural practices have political implications, her work examines the ways in which music and dance are used to re-build the Métis Nation(s); to build alliances among Métis communities and with settlers; and to remake or, problematically, reinforce unequal relations between Settler and Métis peoples.

Learn More: http://directory.uleth.ca/users/monique.giroux

 

Conor Snoek
Assistant Professor
Indigenous Studies
Office: A 454
Phone:  (403) 329-2721
Email: conor.snoek@uleth.ca
Research Interests:
I am an anthropological linguist specialized in the Indigenous languages of the Americas. My research focuses on three areas: lexical semantics (the study of word meaning), historical linguistics (the study of language change), and language revitalization (applying linguistics to make languages sustainable). I am interested in how meaning is structured in different languages, and what this can tell us about the speakers of those languages. The lexical items also evolve over time. Studying lexical evolution in related languages allows us to reconstruct aspects of linguistic and cultural history. I am pursuing historical linguistic questions in Athapaskan (Dene) languages by applying quantitative methods (dialectometry, linguistic phylogenetics) to a lexical database (PACL).  I am gathering lexical and grammatical data at a field site in Mexico, where I am documenting Cerro Xinolatépetl an endangered Totonacan language. I am also actively in researching and supporting language revitalization with Indigenous communities in Alberta, Canada, where I have worked with communities speaking Dene and Algonquian languages
 
Learn More: http://directory.uleth.ca/users/conor.snoek
 

Paul McKenzie-Jones
Assistant Professor
Indigenous Studies
Office: A 442
Phone: (403) 329-2312
Email: paul.mckenziejones@uleth.ca
Research Interests:

Dr. McKenzie-Jones is an Assistant Professor of Native American Studies at the University of Lethbridge and an external research affiliate with the Purai Global Indigenous and Diaspora Research Center of the University of Newcastle, Australia. McKenzie-Jones' research and teaching interests focus on the critical intersections of Indigenous transnationalism, treaty rights, and social justice movements/resistance in the Anglo settler-colonial CANZUS states; North American Indigenous history; and Indigenous futures and pop culture.

His first book, "Clyde Warrior: Tradition, Community, and Red Power" is a biography of Ponca activist Clyde Warrior, the ideological founder of the Red Power Movement. This biography is the first to recognize the full influence of Warrior on the seismic shift in United States federal Indian policy, education reform, and American Indian self-determination that occurred in the late 20th century. 

His current research project focusses upon the intellectual and cultural 'erasure' of imposed US/Canadian settler-colonial borders through transnational Indigenous environmental, cultural, and political, activism and nation (re)building. 

 

Sessional Instructors

Lois Frank 

Sessional Instructor
Indigenous Studies
Office: W 547
Phone: (403) 317-2857
Email: franlv@uleth.ca
 
 
Margaret Lamouche
Sessional Instructor
Indigenous Studies
Office: A 428
Phone: 403-332-5244
Email: margaret.lamouche@uleth.ca
 
 
Administrative Support
 

Administrative Assistant II

Office: A 414 
Phone: (403) 329-2635
Email: tba