How will Writing 1000 help me?


Writing 1000 has evolved as one way to address the different kinds of scholarly reading, writing and reasoning that students encounter as they begin their university-level studies and prepare to think and write in academic and professional contexts.

Writing 1000 thus addresses the wide-range of skills that students at the university-level need to develop to be successful academic readers and writers across the disciplines. The course typically includes theoretical lectures and practical exercises, and it focuses on sentence-skills (punctuation, grammar, common sentence errors, etc.), paragraph development, techniques of summary, analysis, persuasion, information literacy, and ultimately writing research papers, which includes instruction in citation, documentation, plagiarism, annotation, and so forth.

Of course, one does not learn to read and write “perfectly” in a thirteen week course. Nonetheless, as many of our graduates attest, Writing 1000, has proven to be not only an effective way to introduce students to the discursive features of academic culture, to the ways that scholars read and write, but also a way to help them develop effective rhetorical skills that will benefit—and distinguish—them as educated persons in academic, professional, and personal situations.

Taking an Academic Writing course will help students recognize that writing clearly, concisely, and effectively is a valuable skill that, like any other skill, can be learned and improved.An understanding of academic writing, we believe, will enable students to be successful in any social situation, arena, or genre where reading and writing is an indicator of and a showcase for their academic, professional and personal knowledge and abilities.

Please feel free to stop by Academic Writing Program Office in University Hall (D-524), or to contact the Coordinator of the Academic Writing Program, Dr. Clifford Lobe, for more information about our courses.