Selected Canadian Aboriginal Video




Selected Canadian Aboriginal Video

Added March, 2012
Project Channel

Curated by Josephine Mills
Video courtesy of Vtape

On March 1, 2012 the U of L Art Gallery launched six Aboriginal works for Native Awareness Week in our Project Channel space. The curated selection provides a range of recent Aboriginal video making in Canada including the dry humour of Keesic Douglas’ “Rezolution” and Zoe Leigh Hopkins’ “Tsi tkahéhtayen (The Garden);” two beautiful, animated works — Jude Norris’ “Red Buffalo Skydive” and Christiana Latham’s “Lady Raven;” Dana Claxton’s abstract, poetic approach to video with “Say It’s OK;” and an example of the strong Inuit video production with Félix Lajeunesse, PaulRaphaël, and Iglookik’s “Tungijuq.”

 

 

 

 

Rezolution
Keesic Douglas
2008, 9:00

Two people meet in a “Rez” style restaurant as dark secrets are revealed, conflicts arise, and peace is made.

 

 

 

 

 

Tsi tkahéhtayen (The Garden)
Zoe Leigh Hopkins
2009, 10:53

A mystical gardener harvests fruits from the earth that defy everyone’s expectations.

 

 

 

 

 

Red Buffalo Skydive
Jude Norris
2000, 3:30

Red Buffalo Skydive is a 3 minute video featuring a repeating 6 second clip of an animated running buffalo combined with dialogue of the artist repeating a story told to her by a paraplegic man who picked her up hitchhiking. Initially, the imagery and the dialogue do not appear to be related, but as the piece progresses, the viewer may begin to make associations, and even synchronistic connections, between the two stories.

 

 

 

 

Lady Raven
Christiana Latham
2008, 1:30

Using animation, music, and narrative, a depiction of an Aleut’s Native legend is created. The legend of how the woman and the raven became one.

 

 

 

 

 

Say It’s OK
Dana Claxton
2006, 2:11

A young aboriginal boy ponders the representation of self in the context of survival and shapeshifting.

 

 

 

 

 

Tungijuq
Félix Lajeunesse & Paul Raphaë & Igloolik
2009, 7:10
A though-prvoking meditation on the seal-hunt and what it means to the traditional way of life for the Inuit.